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5:00
BRAVA Stingray SOBOTA 21.10.
05:17
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Composer Jurriaan Berger (Zaandam) explores sounds that have long been characteristic for the eastern area of the Dutch province of Groningen. The ‘Veenkoloniën’, peatlands, used to be swamps in the northern parts of the Netherlands until the development of new infrastructure brought wealth to the region. About a century ago, trade and industrialisation boosted the local economy; the sounds of the cardboard factory were heard all through the area. Today, the region’s prosperity seems a thing from the past, forcing the area to plan ahead in search of new opportunities. Which road will restore the peatlands to their former glory?
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6:00
BRAVA Stingray DNES
06:19
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Max Bruch’s first violin concerto in G minor is one of the most popular violin concertos in the repertoire. Bruch started the composition of this piece in 1857 and on April 24th 1866 it was first performed, with Otto von Köningslow on violin and Bruch himself in charge. It was Bruch’s first piece for large orchestra and he found it quite a challenge: unsatisfied with the result, he took the piece from the stand. Only after substantial revisions, with the help of violinist Joseph Joachim among others, a second version was premiered in 1868. This version is played to this day. In this broadcast: the third part.
06:30
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Who could imagine that a failed job application would lead to some of the most beautiful classical music ever written? Employed by Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, an unsatisfied Johann Sebastian Bach craved a career change in 1721. Wishing to join the court of Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg, Bach presented him with six new concertos in the hopes of securing a position. Unfortunately, Christian Ludwig never even thanked the composer for his majestic and superbly beautiful work. Concerto No. 5 employs a standard line-up of recorder, violin, and harpsichord.
06:51
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This composition by Franz Liszt belongs to the second set of 'Années de pčlerinage' which, like the first and third set, consists of pieces inspired by the composer's trips with his mistress Marie d'Agoult. While Liszt in the first set still wanted to describe the landscape in his music, the pieces of this second set are a description of the works or art he encountered. This broadcast shows a selection of three pieces (Sonets 47, 104 and 123) by Daniel Barenboim.
07:11
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Johann Sebastian Bach composed his motet ‘Fürchte dich nicht’ in Leipzig in 1726. The motet is based on a Biblical text from Isaiah and a hymn by Paul Gerhardt. The motet was, like many other motets, probably intended for performance at a funeral. Originally, the motet was written for eight soloists: two sopranos, two altos, two tenors and two basses. The RIAS Kammerchor celebrates its 60th anniversary by performing this motet in Berlin’s Gethsemanekirche.
07:20
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When Antonin Dvorák was elected honourary member of the Royal Philharmonic Society in London in 1884 and invited to write a symphony, the composer was up to the task. He was full of fresh admiration for Brahms’ third symphony and he had just been planning to start on a new composition himself. The first ideas presented themselves when he entered the train station in Prague and a train full of men from Pest drew in. The group was in Prague for a special programme at the National Theatre that was aimed at increasing awareness of the political struggles of the Czech nation. Dvorák decided that his symphony had to reflect these struggles, leading to the birth of a masterpiece. In this broadcast: the second movement.
07:30
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Who could imagine that a failed job application would lead to some of the most beautiful classical music ever written? Employed by Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, an unsatisfied Johann Sebastian Bach craved a career change in 1721. Wishing to join the court of Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg, Bach presented him with six new concertos in the hopes of securing a position. Unfortunately, Christian Ludwig never even thanked the composer for his majestic and superbly beautiful work. Concerto No. 3 is for three violins, three violas, three cellos and basso continuo accompaniment. In its first and third movements.
07:40
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‘Ta-ta-ta-taa’: quite possibly the most famous opening sequence, to one of the most famous symphonies ever written. It has become impossible to think of concert halls today without Beethoven’s ‘Fifth’, but for a symphony this popular it had a rather disastrous opening night. December 22nd 1808 the piece was premiered, alongside the Sixth Symphony, the Fantasy in C minor for Piano, Chorus, and Orchestra, and also the Fourth Piano Concerto and parts of the Mass in C. A concert marathon, in fact, and truly exhausting for the underpaid musicians. Vienna at that time was experiencing a gruesomely cold winter, meaning even the audience had a hard time in the unheated concert hall. Beethoven’s biographer Anton Schindler noted: "the reception accorded to these works was not as desired, and probably no better than the author himself had expected. The public was not endowed with the necessary degree of comprehension for such extraordinary music, and the performance left a great deal to be desired." In this broadcast: the second movement.
07:50
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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Seventeenth Piano Concerto is one of the few concertos he did not write for himself, but for his student Barbara von Ployer, for whom he also wrote his Fourteenth Piano Concerto. This piece was also one of the few to be published during his lifetime, which led to a rare contemporary review its writer praises the elegance of the Andante and the ‘exceptionally beautiful modulations’ in the Allegretto, but also notes the difficulty of the piano part. In this broadcast: the third movement.
08:02
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The philosophy behind ‘Les Salons de Musique’ is to bring about original and exclusive meetings between preeminent musicians. These meetings take place in unusual and intimate venues. The musicians share their emotions with each other and with the audience: a recipe for unforgettable moments. In the French chamber music scene, Syntonia occupies a special place. The ensemble, founded in 1999, is the only quintet in France with a piano. The five members form a tight-knit unit, known for its attachment, dynamic and perfectionism. The press unanimously hails their recordings of the music of Olivier Greif. Their version of Cesar Franck’s Quintet stunned audiences, winning the Quintet the ‘Tribune des Critiques’ in 2010. The ensemble is happy to start musical friendships with other musicians: on this occasion they meet Sarah Nemantanu. This violinist has a long-standing friendship with the ensemble. In early 2011, Figaro Magazine hailed her as one of the six most important violinists of the current music world. She is known to audiences worldwide for her performance of Tchaikovsky’s Violinconcert in Radu Mihaileanu’s film ‘Le Concert’. In this film, Nemantanu was the musical stand-in for Mélanie Laurent. Since her appointment as first violinist of the Orchestra National de France, at age 21, she continues to play performance after performance and to win prize after prize.
BRAVA Stingray ZÍTRA
06:04
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1812 was an eventful year for the already acclaimed as well as deaf composer Ludwig van Beethoven. For one thing, it saw his long-awaited though disappointing meeting with another giant of German art, the poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. In addition to this, his mind was occupied with love-matters as he wrote his famous letter to a nameless ‘Immortal Beloved’, and he got involved in the life of his youngest brother in an attempt to end the latter’s relationship with a maid. Despite all this, he also found the time to compose several new works, including his Symphony No. 7. Its premiere was in 1813, as part of a charity concert for injured soldiers, and featured a star-studded orchestra: besides Louis Spohr on violin, the orchestra boasted the presence of such musical legends as Nepomuk Hummel, Giacomo Meyerbeer and Antonio Salieri. This program broadcasts the symphony’s second part.
06:17
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The Venezuelan Brass Ensemble, consisting of about 50 percussionists and brass players from the Simon Bolivar Youth Orchestra, wows Berlin audiences with its ability. At this concert, the immensely talented young musicians play South American pieces as well as great classics such as Mussorgsky’s ‘Pictures at an Exhibition’. In this broadcast: Mendoza’s ‘Guerra de Secciones’.
06:30
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Jean-Philippe Rameau was a musician of many talents: he was renowned for his innovative and popular operas, we know he was a great organ player and a grand musical thinker. Rameau Sr. was also a musician, but he had destined his son for a career in law. Music seems to have been in his blood, though, and after having taught himself to play various instruments as well as basic music theory, he was allowed to start a career in music - at long last - at age 18. Music took him all over Europe and eventually brought him to the French court. This broadcast shows a performance by Roland Pöntinen of his ‘Gavotte et doubles’.
06:43
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Many 18th century Russian composers have been forgotten, but Dmitry Bortniansky (1751-1825) has escaped that fate. Bortniansky, who was very much loved and admired in his day, was as respected after death as in life: his chamber music and vocal compositions remained very popular. As Director of the Imperial Chapel Choir, he composed an impressive number of choral pieces, which unfortunately have not all survived. Among his published compositions are 35 sacred concertos, 10 concertos for double choruses, two complete liturgical works, several Cherubic Hymns, and countless settings of traditional orthodox chants. In Bortniansky’s works, the Russian choral composition got its classic shape: three parts in fast-slow-fast movements, augmented by elements of secular instrumental concerts and sacred vocal music.
06:51
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Confusing as it may be: Ludwig van Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto was in fact composed ten years prior to his First Piano Concerto. The cause of this mess lies with the composer himself: Beethoven held back the publication of what we know as the Second Piano Concerto until after that of the First Piano Concerto, so he could thoroughly review the piece. Together with his septet and First Symphony, this piano concerto was finally performed at his official Vienna debut on April 2, 1800 at the Hofburg theatre, with Beethoven himself at the piano. The composer had long ceased to be an unknown in Austria’s capital: he had been playing private concerts all around town for years. In this broadcast: the second movement.
07:02
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Many popular 17th century chants were performed on traditional, usually unattributed melodies. An example of a four-part polyphonic "kant" paean from the second half of the 17th century is the Maria hymn by the monk and poet Yepifani Slavinetsky, of who only his year of death is known. A kant, used in the liturgy, was mainly used in the Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarus churches. In Slavinetski’s Maria hymn, he addresses the famous Iverskaya icon of the Greek Iviron monastery in the monastic state of the holy Mount Athos. Legend has it, that the Iverskaya icon was produced by the evangelist Lucas. The anonymous composer of ‘O Most Holy Maiden Mary’ provides this kant with traditional, parallel voicings and short cadenzas.
07:08
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After composing his Symphony No. 1 in February and March 1865, the Czech composer Anton
07:20
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In 1782, when young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart had lived in Vienna for over a year, the rewards of his Singspiel (literally: "song-play") ‘Die Entführung aus dem Serail’ started to come in and he was flooded with requests for new pieces. His father, Leopold Mozart, did not agree with his son’s choice of moving to Vienna and moreover refused to give his blessing to the latter’s intended marriage to Constanze Weber. He did, however, want his son to write the music for the inauguration ceremony of the new mayor of Salzburg, Sigmund Haffner, and even though the young Mozart was up to his ears in work he honoured his father’s request and composed a serenade. When six months on he needed a new symphony, he remembered this piece, adapted it and created the Haffner Symphony. The premiere was a great success, the composer wrote to his father: "the theatre could not have been more crowded...every box was full. But what pleased me most of all was that His Majesty the Emperor was present and, goodness!—how delighted he was and how he applauded me!" In this broadcast: the second movement.
07:30
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Johann Sebastian Bach probably composed his Sonatas for Violin and Harpsichord BWV 1014 through 1019 while working as chapel master of Köthen. It is assumed he wrote the sonatas for Prince Leopold and later adapted them for personal use in Leipzig. Maybe it because of this that the pieces are very suitable for amateurs, though all sonatas also have enough finesse to pose professional musicians with a challenge. The separate pieces are meant to be played as a set, like the 'Brandenburg concertos'.
BRAVA Stingray ČTVRTEK 19.10.
06:30
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Russian pianist Boris Berezovsky plays German composer Dafydd Llywelyn's "Mutata Consilia - Change of Plans'.
06:48
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For two centuries it was assumed that Ludwig van Beethoven composed his Second Piano Concerto as a 23-year-old in 1794, when he was preparing his debut in Vienna and needed a show piece. It is quite an accomplishment to be able to compose and perform a concerto like this one at such a young age. The piece was indeed part of the programme for his first public performance on March 29 1795. From letters it now appears, though, that a large part of the concerto, the first two movements at least, were written as early as 1789. Six years before his official debut! Impressive as that may be, Beethoven himself was not entirely satisfied with the piece. Throughout the years he continued to make changes to the concerto and only in 1801 he granted permission to publish it, to which he adds in an accompanying letter: ,,I do not claim it to be one of my best ... However, it will not disgrace you to publish it". In this broadcast: the second movement.
06:57
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Unlike his prior symphonies, Anton
07:07
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Johann Sebastian Bach composed his motet ‘Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied’ around 1727. Like many of his motets, the text of this piece is based on the Bible and a hymn. It was probably performed first on January 1, 1724, in celebration of the new year. Unfortunately, the original manuscript has not survived, but the voice parts of the first two movements have been handed down through history. Many generations of musicians have made reconstructions of the work, as did Ton Koopman. The RIAS Kammerchor celebrates its 60th anniversary by performing this motet in Berlin’s Gethsemanekirche.
07:24
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This concert, which is organized annually as part of the official festivities in conjunction with the Nobel Prize Ceremony, presents the most renowned classical musicians. This broadcast brings you the third part of Maurice Ravel’s ‘Piano Concerto’.
07:33
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Sergei Rachmaninoff’s third piano concerto is not only famous, but also notorious. It is famous among audiences worldwide because of its wonderful musical lines, yet notorious among pianists because of its frighteningly challenging solo score. It is widely viewed as one of the most difficult piano concertos. Josef Hofmann, to whom Rachmaninoff dedicated the piece, never played it publicly because (he claimed) the work "did not suit his style". On its premiere performance – November 28 1909, New York – the piano was played by Rachmaninoff himself, who apart from his composing career was also a highly gifted pianist. For a long time, Rachmaninoff’s third piano concerto was eclipsed by his shorter (and easier) second piano concerto, yet its virtuosity eventually secured it a stable spot in the concert repertoire. This program broadcasts its first part.
07:54
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The philosophy behind ‘Les Salons de Musique’ is to bring about original and exclusive meetings between preeminent musicians. These meetings take place in unusual and intimate venues. The musicians share their emotions with each other and with the audience: a recipe for unforgettable moments. This 20th episode of ‘Les Salons de Musique’ brings us Rosemary Standley, who revisits a mix of old, popular folk as well as art music. She explores all genres while taking us on a journey to enchanting worlds. While juggling a range of composers, she masters their repertoires. For her episode of ‘Les Salons de Musique’, Rosemary Standley offers us a four-legged journey. First, she invites a number of musical friends, including Bruno Helstroffer (theorbo and guitar), Elizabeth Geiger (clavichord), and Martin Bauer (viola da gamba), with whom she brings her personal take on early music to the stage. Then, the vocalist invites pianist Sylvian Griotto to join her in performance. After this, accompanied by the Brazilian cellist Dom la Nena, she leaves the beaten track behind for a folk recital. Rosemary Standley performs music written or made popular by the likes of Kurt Weill, Peggy Lee, Henry Purcell, and Leonard Cohen. Last but not least, the ‘Moriarty’ ensemble appears on stage. This group was founded in 1995 by six musicians from American, French, Swiss, and Vietnamese descend. Moriarty finds its inspiration in the American blues of the 1930s, while elements from jazz, traditional Malinese music, electronic music, folk and klezmer are also put in the mix.
08:54
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Confusing as it may be: Ludwig van Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto was in fact composed ten years prior to his First Piano Concerto. The cause of this mess lies with the composer himself: Beethoven held back the publication of what we know as the Second Piano Concerto until after that of the First Piano Concerto, so he could thoroughly review the piece. Together with his septet and First Symphony, this piano concerto was finally performed at his official Vienna debut on April 2, 1800 at the Hofburg theatre, with Beethoven himself at the piano. The composer had long ceased to be an unknown in Austria’s capital: he had been playing private concerts all around town for years.
BRAVA Stingray PÁTEK 20.10.
06:00
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Gustavo Dudamel conducts the LA Phil in a swinging performance of the Huapango.
06:09
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When Ludwig van Beethoven, on April 5th 1803, took his place at the piano to start the premiere of his Third Piano Concerto in C minor Op. 37, hardly a note of the solo had been put to paper. His friend Ignaz von Seyfield, recruited to turn pages at this concert, later recalls: ,,I saw almost nothing but empty leaves at the most on one page or the other a few Egyptian hieroglyphics wholly unintelligible to me scribbled down to serve as clues for him for he played nearly all of the solo part from memory, since, as was so often the case, he had not had time to put it all down on paper." Only a year later did Beethoven find the time to write the full piano score. Mozart’s Piano Concerto in C minor KV 491 served as a model for this concerto, and the piece was dedicated to Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia. In this broadcast: the second movement.
06:30
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This work forms part of Franz Liszt’s ‘Années de p
06:45
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For two centuries it was assumed that Ludwig van Beethoven composed his Second Piano Concerto as a 23-year-old in 1794, when he was preparing his debut in Vienna and needed a show piece. It is quite an accomplishment to be able to compose and perform a concerto like this one at such a young age. The piece was indeed part of the programme for his first public performance on March 29 1795. From letters it now appears, though, that a large part of the concerto, the first two movements at least, were written as early as 1789. Six years before his official debut! Impressive as that may be, Beethoven himself was not entirely satisfied with the piece. Throughout the years he continued to make changes to the concerto and only in 1801 he granted permission to publish it, to which he adds in an accompanying letter: ,,I do not claim it to be one of my best ... However, it will not disgrace you to publish it". In this broadcast: the first movement.
07:03
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If you could assign human ages to classical music, Arturo Márquez’s Dánzon No. 2 would still be a toddler. This swinging piece was first performed in 1994, by the Orchestra Filarmonica of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (National Autonomous University of Mexico), that also commissioned Márquez to write it. The title of this contemporary piece refers to the Dánzon, a type of dance originally from Cuba but also important in the folklore of Veracruz, one of Mexico’s 31 states.
07:13
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During February and March 1865, the Czech composer Anton
07:29
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The French pianist Lise de La Salle (1988) first performed on French radio at age 9; it proved to be the first of her many successes. At the early age of 12, she won the First Prize at an international competition in Germany. In 2003, she won First Prize in the category ‘European Young Concert Artists’ in Paris. Lise de La Salle played in countless renowned concert venues, among which the Tonhalle Zurich, the Berliner Philharmonie, and the Amsterdam Concertgebouw. She recorded many CDs for the Na
BRAVA Stingray SOBOTA 21.10.
06:10
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,, "For me," Astor Piazzolla once said, "tango was always for the ear rather than the feet." Legendary tango composer Piazolla’s family relocated from Argentina to New York when Astor was quite young, but to not lose the bond with the ‘homeland’ his father bought a bandoneón. A passion was born: the composer dedicated the rest of his life to the tango. Calling Piazolla the single most important figure in the history of the tango would, therefore, be no exaggeration. The ‘Fuga y misterio’ is taken from the fifth scene of the tango opera ‘Maria de Buenos Aires’, in which the heroine walks through the heart of Buenos Aires.
06:16
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On the eve of the 300th anniversary, the city of Saint Petersburg, the Russian ‘window to Europe’, celebrated its jubilee with a great musical spectacle. The cr
06:30
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Jonas Kaufmann sings the beautiful aria ‘Gott, welch Dunkel hier’ from Beethoven’s opera 'Fidelio'.
06:42
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Confusing as it may be: Ludwig van Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto was in fact composed ten years prior to his First Piano Concerto. The cause of this mess lies with the composer himself: Beethoven held back the publication of what we know as the Second Piano Concerto until after that of the First Piano Concerto, so he could thoroughly review the piece. Together with his septet and First Symphony, this piano concerto was finally performed at his official Vienna debut on April 2, 1800 at the Hofburg theatre, with Beethoven himself at the piano. The composer had long ceased to be an unknown in Austria’s capital: he had been playing private concerts all around town for years. In this broadcast: the third movement.
06:54
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The German hymn ‘Jesu, meine Freude‘ was composed by Johann Franck in 1650. Johann Sebastian Bach used this hymn for his motet and his prelude for choir and organ, which he composed for a funeral. The prelude can be found in his ‘Orgelbüchlein’, a volumewhich contains 46 preludes for organ. Other composers used this hymn as a source of inspiration for their compositions. The RIAS Kammerchor celebrates its 60th anniversary by performing J. S. Bach’s motet in Berlin’s Gethsemanekirche. Performers: Hans-Christoph Rademann, RIAS Kammerchor
07:13
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Who could imagine that a failed job application would lead to some of the most beautiful classical music ever written? Employed by Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, an unsatisfied Johann Sebastian Bach craved a career change in 1721. Wishing to join the court of Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg, Bach presented him with six new concertos in the hopes of securing a position. Unfortunately, Christian Ludwig never even thanked the composer for his majestic and superbly beautiful work. In Concerto No. 6, Bach forgoes traditional violins opting instead for two solo violas at time when the instrument was strictly for accompaniment.
07:29
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None other than Ludwig van Beethoven played Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 25 at his first Vienna solo performance. A special homage for a special concert. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart completed this piece on December 4, 1786 and performed it for the first time on the day after. The concerto probably met with a favourable reception, as Mozart afterwards continued to play this piece on a regular basis. In this broadcast: the second movement.
07:36
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Born through the friendship between three families (Capuçon, Chalmin and Scapolan), the Bel Air Festival was, for 15 years, a unique place to share, to meet and exchange between musicians coming from all around the globe. This 15th and last edition promises to have magical moments, gathering the most faithful musicians who have accompanied Renaud Capuçon over the past years. You are now listening to Arvo Pärt’s ‘Tabula Rasa’.
08:13
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The philosophy behind ‘Les Salons de Musique’ is to bring about original and exclusive meetings between preeminent musicians. These meetings take place in unusual and intimate venues. The musicians share their emotions with each other and with the audience: a recipe for unforgettable moments. Although Lise de la Salle is still a youngster, she is hardly the new kid on the block: the pianist, who was taught by Pascal Nemirovski from age 10, was unanimously elected as first of her class when she studied with Pierre Réach at the Paris Conservatory. At 15, Bruno Rigutto helped her develop her career, which led to performances in the world’s most prestigious music venues. She recorded her first CD in 2002, featuring compositions by Ravel and Rachmaninov. Later, she recorded a CD devoted to the music of Bach and Liszt. In 2011, she released an album with works by Chopin. The members of the Modigliani Quartet are also alumni of the Paris Conservatory. In 2004, 2005, and 2006, they managed to secure three prestigious awards.
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9:00
BRAVA Stingray DNES
09:05
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Lang Lang, the most popular pianist in the world (according to CNN) performs live in Vienna's monumental Musikverein in this piano recital recorded especially for television. You can now enjoy Beethoven's 'Piano Sonata No. 3'.
09:47
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After the premiere of ‘Un ballo in Maschera’ it seemed as if Giuseppe Verdi had lost his interest in composing. He did not put a single note to paper in two years. Towards the end of 1860, however, he received a composition assignment from as prestigious a client as the Russian court, and Verdi decided to end his period of artistic silence. He composed ‘La Forza del Destino’ (The power of fate) on a libretto by Francesco Maria Piave and the result is on of his most dramatic and complex operas. In this broadcast: the overture.
10:02
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Performing Ludwig van Beethoven's nine symphonies is the highlight of Claudio Abbado's 12-year tenure as chief conductor of the Berliner Philharmoniker. This monumental feat was lauded as "the most wonderful symphonic cycle of the past decade" by Italian newspaper La Repubblica, and the Süddeutsche Zeitung was also full of praise: "Abbado releases all the conflicting elements of Ludwig van Beethoven's cosmos - nothing works anymore, the music threatens to explode once and for all, deliverance has to come from somewhere. A powerful moment of unsparing analysis of Beethoven and his own self…"
10:42
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The philosophy behind ‘Les Salons de Musique’ is to bring about original and exclusive meetings between preeminent musicians. These meetings take place in unusual and intimate venues. The musicians share their emotions with each other and with the audience: a recipe for unforgettable moments. Today’s performance by Vincent Peirani, Michel Portal and Emile Parisien lends ‘Les Salons de Musique’ a jazzy air. These artists have worked together before, with results that were invariably breath-taking. Other talented artists who take part in this jazzy episode of ‘Les Salons de Musique’ are Michael Wollny, Michel Benita, François Salque, and Serena Fisseau. Vincent Peirani is best known as a sideman (with Roberto Alagna, Daniel Humair, and Youn Sun Nah), but this time, he gets his fair share of the spotlights. On the album ‘Thrill Box’, the accordionist shows his frontman’s potential: it’s full of humour, sensitivity, and enthusiasm. He’s also the life of the party in today’s episode of ‘Les Salons de Musique’!
11:47
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Born through the friendship between three families (Capuçon, Chalmin and Scapolan), the Bel Air Festival was, for 15 years, a unique place to share, to meet and exchange between musicians coming from all around the globe. This 15th and last edition promises to have magical moments, gathering the most faithful musicians who have accompanied Renaud Capuçon over the past years. You are now listening to Antonio Vivaldi’s ‘Concerto for Two Violins and Strings in A minor’, Op. 3, No. 8.
11:57
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This world famous ‘Adagio’ by Samuel Barber is now mostly known in its orchestral version, but originally the ‘Adagio’ is the slow section of his First String Quartet. Because of its emotional impact, the composition is often connected to mourning – it was played at the funerals of both Roosevelt and J.F. Kennedy. This version for orchestra was first performed in 1938 and became a world wide success. The ‘Adagio’ was for instance one of few American pieces that were being played in Russia during the Cold War.
BRAVA Stingray ZÍTRA
09:06
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Chinese master pianist Lang Lang plays Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 23 in the Musikverein in Vienna.
09:34
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During February and March 1865, the Czech composer Anton
09:43
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Gustav Mahler’s third symphony is, with its unequalled length of approximately 95 minutes, an exciting, mysterious, overbearing and moving piece. In the six parts of this marvellous symphony, Mahler expresses his musical vision on nature, and the place of mankind in nature. The composer uses, much in the same way as he did in his second symphony, material from his earlier 'Wunderhorn Liederen', closing the fourth movement with a beautiful alto solo set to a Friedrich Nietzsche poem, and closing the fifth movement with a mixed female-boys-choir. The symphony originally consisted of seven movements, but Mahler cut the seventh part eventually and used it as the last movement for his fourth symphony. Performed and recorded in 2007 by Claudio Abbado and the Lucerne Festival Orchestra, the Arnold Schoenberg Choir, the Wien Tölzer Knabenchoir, and mezzo-soprano Anna Larson. During this broadcast, the second movement.
10:05
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In 2013, the Finnish conductor Hannu Lintu was appointed principal conductor of the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra. Lintu studied piano and cello at the Sibelius Academy and the Turku conservatorium in Sweden’s southeast. He started conducting at the Sibelius Academy. His many concerts with the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra in 2012 made him the obvious replacement for Sakari Oramo, who, after many years as conductor and concert master, terminated his contract in 2012. The orchestra specializes in the performance of Finnish music, but also performs the great masterpieces of Gustav Mahler and Béla Bartók. The Finnish composer Jean Sibelius is the orchestra’s favourite, as well as the conductor. In cooperation with Finland’s national public broadcasting company Yle, all seven Sibelius symphonies are recorded and broadcast. After a brief spoken introduction about the piece, the orchestra performs the complete symphony. In many ways, Sibelius’ seventh and last Symphony is his best symphony. As its parts are logical extensions of each other, the Symphony was clearly conceived as a unity. Despite its relative brevity, its compositional style is a clear precursor to the direction future great composers would take, among whom Anton Webern. Although all Sibelius’s seven symphonies were glorious, they do not dominate his complete oeuvre. His Violin concerto and his symphonic poem ‘Finlandia’ have received much more fame and popularity.
11:00
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Jeroen de Groot plays works by Bach
BRAVA Stingray ČTVRTEK 19.10.
09:32
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Born through the friendship between three families (Capuçon, Chalmin and Scapolan), the Bel Air Festival was, for 15 years, a unique place to share, to meet and exchange between musicians coming from all around the globe. This 15th and last edition promises to have magical moments, gathering the most faithful musicians who have accompanied Renaud Capuçon over the past years. You are now listening to Antonio Vivaldi’s ‘Concerto for Four Violins in B minor’, Op. 3, No. 10.
09:44
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In 1834, Robert Schumann was engaged to young pianist Ernestine von Fricken, a student of his teacher Frederick Wieck. He realised that the letters of his intended’s place of birth (Asch) could be translated – according to the German system – into music notes: A remained, S became E-flat, C stayed C and H became B. This musical motif became the material for his piano cycle in 21 parts, ‘Carnaval’. You are watching the orchestration by Maurice Ravel
09:55
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Having lived in Vienna for more than a year, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s career gained a strong boost in 1782 from the enormous popularity of his Singspiel ‘Die Entführung aus dem Serail’ (‘The abduction from the seraglio’). Meanwhile his father Leopold Mozart still disapproved of his son’s decision to move to Vienna and also refused to accept his planned marriage to Constanze Weber. Despite these objections, Leopold asked his son to compose for the inauguration of Salzburg’s new mayor Sigmund Haffner, whereupon Mozart shoved his mounting pile of work aside to compose a serenade. Then, six month later, he needed a new symphony, remembered his serenade, and transformed it into Symphony No. 35 (‘Haffner’), which premiered to great acclaim in 1783. As the composer himself wrote to his father: ,,The theater was packed to the rafters. Yet what most pleased me was that his Royal Highness the Emperor was in the audience – and good heavens how he cheered me!". This program broadcasts the first part.
10:02
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Join the acclaimed Mariinsky Orchestra on a train journey across the vastness of Russia in the documentary Mariinsky on Track. The orchestra's current chief conductor Valery Gergiev co-founded the Moscow Easter Festival in 2002. The 2013 edition of this music festival included performances in large cities across Russia’s different regions. In addition to outstanding concert footage, Mariinsky on Track shows us the musicians' approach to the project and informs us of hardships on the road. Watch and share these unforgettable musical moments with one of Russia’s oldest and finest musical organizations.
10:37
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Works: Die drei Zigeuner, S320ii (Soloist: Peter Gijsbertsen), Ich möchte hingehn, S296iii (Soloist: Estefanía Perdomo), Wagner/Liszt: 'Am stillen Herd' Lied aus Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, S448, Wagner/Liszt: Spinnerlied aus der Oper Der fliegende Höllander, S.440, Wagner/Liszt: Phantasiestück über Motive aus der Oper Rienzi, S.439, Les jeux d'eaux a la Ville d'Este, S. 163/4, Scherzo und Marsch, S.177. Pianist Nicholas Susi studied at the music departments of the Universities of Kansas and Michigan and the Hochschule für Musik und Tanz in Cologne. His main teachers were Zena Ilyashov, Jack Winerock, Zitta Zohar, Arthur Greene and Nina Tichman. He has taken part in masterclasses with Leon Fleisher, Richard Goode and Vladimir Feltsman. He won the First Prize at the Robert M. Spire Piano Competition in Omaha (2008) and at the International Klavierfestival Rosrath Competition (2013). Nicholas Susi has often performed in recitals and as a lied accompanist and soloist with various orchestras in Europe and the United States, among which the Wiener Residenz Orchester, the Omaha Symphony Orchestra, the Philharmonia of Greater Kansas City, and the St. Louis Chamber Orchestra.
11:42
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The name of the Russian composer Maxim Berezovsky (1745?-1777) was first recorded in 1758. In that year, the future court composer and director of the chapel choir was hired as a young member of the Imperial Court Choir. Biographers disagree about Berezovsky’s background and training, but they agree that the talented vocalist of probably Ukrainian origin became the most important composer of choral music during his career in St. Petersburg. Unfortunately, most of Berezovsky’s compositions were lost in an arson attack on the imperial chapel. Whatever remains of his music is characterized by an extraordinary technique, a sophisticated notation, and an unusual combination of fiery Italian melodicism and a soft Russian melodiousness.
11:51
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Time and again, Holland Baroque stuns audiences with its wide variety of musical programmes. Each programme features a no–holds–barred musical meeting with baroque musicians, and also with musicians from other genres. Rest assured: baroque music always takes centre stage. In this broadcast, Holland Baroque performs the Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in 1721. At the time Bach was in the service of Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, but he was secretly on the lookout for a new employer. Bach chose to dedicate his Brandenburg concerts to Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt, hoping the Margrave would invite him to his court. Unfortunately this open application came to nothing – Bach did not even receive a thank-you from the Margrave. Bach composed his Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 for three violins, three cellos, and basso continuo, all played here wonderfully by the members of Holland Baroque.
BRAVA Stingray PÁTEK 20.10.
09:03
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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 17 is one of the few concertos he did not write for himself, but for his student Barbara von Ployer, for whom he also wrote his Fourteenth Piano Concerto. This piece was also one of the few to be published during his lifetime, which led to a rare contemporary review its writer praises the elegance of the Andante and the ‘exceptionally beautiful modulations’ in the Allegretto, but also notes the difficulty of the piano part.
09:33
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Ludwig van Beethoven was an exceptional pianist, perhaps that is why people tend to forget he was also a capable violinist. Although perhaps not a virtuoso, Beethoven loved the instrument and wrote no lesser than ten sonatas for it, several pieces of chamber music and of course the violin concerto. His ‘Two Romances for Violin and Orchestra’ stand out , because they are two pieces of a whole that are still very reminiscent of solo concertos. In this broadcast: the first Romance.
09:41
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To honour the occasion of the founding of the Berliner Philharmoniker on May 1st, 1882, this leading German orchestra organises an annual ‘Europa Concert’ on the exact founding day. The concert is always led by a world-famous conductor and takes place at an important cultural and historical centre in Europe, while being aired worldwide. In this, it has become the Berlin counterpart to the Wiener Philharmoniker’s New Year’s concert. The first edition was organised in 1991 in Prague. In 2002 the Europa Concert took place inside the famous Palermo opera house. In one of the most beautiful old opera temples of Europe, Italian maestro Claudio Abbado shows where his roots are. It is with a reason that this celebratory programme ends with a very fitting encore: the overture from Verdi’s ‘I Vespri Siciliani’. The story of this so-called ‘Grand Opera’ is based upon a historic event, the Sicilian Vespers of 1282. Verdi wrote this piece in the tradition of the French Grand Opera for Paris, but it became most famous in its Italian version. The Overture ‘I Vespri Siciliani’ is one of the best-loved pieces in the Italian opera repertoire.
09:51
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Born through the friendship between three families (Capuçon, Chalmin and Scapolan), the Bel Air Festival was, for 15 years, a unique place to share, to meet and exchange between musicians coming from all around the globe. This 15th and last edition promises to have magical moments, gathering the most faithful musicians who have accompanied Renaud Capuçon over the past years. You are now listening to Antonio Vivaldi’s ‘Concerto for Two Violins in D minor’, Op. 3, No. 11.
10:00
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The Venezuelan Brass Ensemble, consisting of about 50 percussionists and brass players from the Simon Bolivar Youth Orchestra, wows Berlin audiences with its ability. At this concert, the immensely talented young musicians play South American pieces as well as great classics such as Mussorgsky’s ‘Pictures at an Exhibition’. In this broadcast: Abreu’s ‘Tico Tico’.
10:07
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In 1854 young Johannes Brahms lived in Düsseldorf, where he helped his good friend Clara Schumann to look after her seven children. Her husband Robert Schumann, who was also Brahms’ mentor, had been admitted to an asylum after a failed attempted suicide earlier that year. It was in these circumstances that Brahms started on two sketches for a first symphony. One of these sketches in 1858 grew into his First Piano Concerto, but the second remained unused for many years. Because Brahms was an unbelievable perfectionist, he needed as many as 21 years to finish his first symphony. But this was not the only reason: friends of the composer and the audience expected Brahms to become the ‘heir’of Ludwig van Beethoven. An expectation that was not easy to fulfill and that caused some headaches. The piece’s premiere on November 4th 1876 was a great success: it was even labelled ‘Beethoven’s Tenth Symphony’.
10:57
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The philosophy behind ‘Les Salons de Musique’ is to bring about original and exclusive meetings between preeminent musicians. These meetings take place in unusual and intimate venues. The musicians share their emotions with each other and with the audience: a recipe for unforgettable moments. Over the past few years, pianist Cédric Tibergien has made a career for himself that spans the globe. He has played at the world’s largest concert stages: New York’s Carnegie Hall, Washington’s Kennedy Center, Vienna’s Musikverein, Paris’ Salle Pleyel and the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées. His performance with Washington’s National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Christoph Eschenbach led to rave reviews in the American press. Immediately afterwards, the Boston Symphony Orchestra invited him for a subscribers’ series in the 2011/12 season and for a concert at Carnegie Hall. In the following seasons, he performed all Beethoven’s piano concertos with the Orchestre National d’Île-de-France conducted by Enrique Mazzola. He also turned with the symphony orchestras of Melbourne, Perth, Queensland, Adelaide, Tasmania and Auckland. Viola player Antoine Tamestit plays a 1672 Stradivarius, on loan by the Habisreutinger Foundation. Tamestit was born in 1979 and was taught by Jean Sulem at the Parisian Conservatoire national supérieur de musique et de danse. Later, he studied at Yale under Jesse Levine and the Tokyo String Quartet, after which he studied under Tabea Zimmermann in Berlin. Since he won, in succession, the Concours international d'alto Maurice Vieux (Paris, 2000) and the Primrose International Viola Competition (Chicago, 2001), he has found himself in the spotlights internationally.
BRAVA Stingray SOBOTA 21.10.
09:19
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Ludwig van Beethoven was an exceptional pianist, perhaps that is why people tend to forget he was also a capable violinist. Although perhaps not a virtuoso, Beethoven loved the instrument and wrote no lesser than ten sonatas for it, several pieces of chamber music and of course the violin concerto. His ‘Two Romances for Violin and Orchestra’ stand out , because they are two pieces of a whole that are still very reminiscent of solo concertos. This performance stars Kolja Blacher, former concertmaster of the Berliner Philharmoniker.
09:37
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The musicians of the Cleveland Orchestra prove here that Austrians are not the only ones who can play a waltz. But to be fair: being led by Austrian-born conductor Franz Welser-Möst must have helped… In this broadcast, Von Suppé’s Light Cavalry Overture.
09:44
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In 1943, after his health had deteriorated over a very short period of time, Béla Bartók was diagnosed with leukaemia. Almost three years earlier he had escaped World War II and left Europe for the United States, but there he felt isolated artistically and had financial problems on top of that. Recognition he only received for his piano playing, but due to his bad health he could not perform anymore after January 1943. The Hungarian composer was emotionally and physically bankrupt. He was in hospital when Serge Koussevitzky, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, came to ask him to compose a large orchestral piece. Bartók did not know the assignment was financed by his fellow emigrants and good friends violinist Joseph Szigeti and conductor Fritz Reiner. The assignment, to Bartók, came at a crucial stage in his life: he recovered his energy and managed to finish his Concerto for Orchestra within seven weeks. The premiere on December 1st 1944 in Boston was a great success and Bartók’s music now finally received recognition in the United States as well. New requests for compositions were made, but Bartók’s health once again failed him: he died in September 1945. In this broadcast: the second movement.
09:51
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‘From the New World’ is the title of Antonín Dvorák’s ninth and final symphony, which has proven to be his most popular. He completed the symphony in 1893 while he was serving as director of the National Conservatory of Music of America. For this piece, Dvorák was inspired by the music of America and by the Afro-American spirituals he heard there. He was convinced that the so-called ‘negro spiritual’ would lie at the basis of the future American approach to composition. The Symphony No. 9 was received with applause after each movement: the absolute peak in the career of the Czech composer. Today’s broadcast is part of a series of all nine Dvorák Symphonies, which were performed by the Czech Philharmonic under the baton of the Czech conductor Jirí Belohlávek in 2014. Belohlávek won the Czech National Conducting Competition in 1970. After this, he served as guest conductor of the Czech Philharmonic for two years. Afterwards, Belohlávek was often found in Prague; moreover, he was guest conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and the BBC Symphony Orchestra. In 2010 it was announced that he would return to the Czech Philharmonic as principal conductor, which resulted in in this string beautiful performances of Dvorák’s symphonies.
10:05
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We present the young and brilliant world famous American violinist Joshua Bell, performing Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D major at the Nobel Prize Concert 2010. As part of the official Nobel Week, the world’s most renowned artists gather each year to pay tribute to the Nobel Laureates. The concert is a special highlight in the series. On the rostrum: Sakari Oramo the Chief Conductor and Artistic Advisor of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra.
10:46
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The philosophy behind ‘Les Salons de Musique’ is to bring about original and exclusive meetings between preeminent musicians. These meetings take place in unusual and intimate venues. The musicians share their emotions with each other and with the audience: a recipe for unforgettable moments. Romain Leleu gives the trumpet a voice. To achieve this, he takes his inspiration from all kinds of music, turning arias into trumpet concertos, and digging up long forgotten musical treasures. A precise job, which Leleu applies himself to masterfully and with visible enthusiasm. From the start of his career, the artist has taken it upon himself to reinterpret the classical and contemporary repertoire, both on his instrument of choice and on other wind instruments, among which the cornet, the bugle, and the piccolo trumpet. In 2009, Leleu was honoured as the most promising instrumental soloist by the Victoires de la Musique; these days, he’s seen as one of the greatest trumpeters of his generation. For this episode of ‘Les Salons de Musique’, Leleu invited a guest: despite his youth, pianist Adam Laloum has won many awards and has graced the stages of countless prestigious music festivals. His interpretations are sensitive, captivating, and virtuoso. The ensemble ‘Convergences’, founded by Romain Leleu, toys with music genres, thus lending its recitals a new dimension. The meeting between string instruments and brass instruments results in moments of great musical beauty.
11:48
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In time for his 65th birthday in November 2007, Daniel Barenboim has completed a cycle of Beethoven's piano concertos. Recorded live at the prestigious Klavier-Festival Ruhr in May 2007, this recording reflects both a very individual and special reading of Beethoven’s music and the artist’s life-long dedication to the composer. Daniel Barenboim is one of the most prolific and high-profile artists performing on international stages today and Beethoven’s masterpieces have been a key part of his repertoire throughout his career, both as conductor and as pianist. Beethoven himself was a keyboard virtuoso of almost awesome abilities who created a sensation wherever he played. It is no wonder, therefore, that the piano was central to Beethoven’s overall output. Daniel Barenboim, artistic personality and former wunderkind, long an essential part of the international musical scene both on the conductor’s podium and at the piano, is the perfect match for this demanding music. Conducting and playing at the same time, Barenboim chose his orchestra of almost two decades, the Staatskapelle Berlin, which he has praised warmly for its exceptional, dark and warm sound. With a tradition reaching back to 1570, the Staatskapelle Berlin is one of the oldest orchestras in the world. Barenboim plays Beethoven brings together two musical masterminds. In this broadcast: the third part.
11:57
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This concert is Daniel Barenboim’s very personal homage to Italy and to Franz Liszt. At this solo recital, at the beautiful Teatro alla Scala in Milan, he exclusively played Liszt material, like the piano legend ‘St. François d'Assise. La prédication aux oiseaux’ in this recording. Famous German Romantic Franz Liszt owes most of his present-day fame to his extensive body of work for piano. In his own day he was seen as a revolutionary, representing the New German school together with Wagner. What most do not know is that towards the end of his life Liszt became a religious composer, often dubbed ‘Abbot Liszt’. Around 1840 people started calling him the greatest pianist of all time. The 1860’s, the period in which he wrote his two ‘Legends’ for piano, were a sad time in Liszt’s life. On December 13, 1859 he lost his son Daniel and in 1862 his daughter Blandine died. In 1863, Liszt retreated to a small, Spartan apartment in the Madonna del Rosario convent, just outside of Rome. Here he composed, among other things, the first legend St François d'Assise (S.175/1), a piece based upon the religious story of St. Francis of Assisi who preached to the birds.
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12:07
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In time for his 65th birthday in 2007, Daniel Barenboim has completed a cycle of Beethoven's piano concertos. Recorded live at the Klavier-Festival Ruhr in May 2007, this recording reflects both a very individual and special reading of Beethoven’s music and the artist’s life-long dedication to the composer. Barenboim is one of the most prolific and high-profile artists performing on international stages today and Beethoven’s masterpieces have been a key part of his repertoire throughout his career, both as conductor and as pianist. Beethoven himself was a keyboard virtuoso of almost awesome abilities who created a sensation wherever he played. It is no wonder, therefore, that the piano was central to Beethoven’s overall output. Barenboim, artistic personality and former wunderkind, long an essential part of the international musical scene both on the conductor’s podium and at the piano, is the perfect match for this demanding music. Conducting and playing at the same time, Barenboim chose his orchestra of almost two decades, the Staatskapelle Berlin, which he has praised warmly for its exceptional, dark and warm sound. During this recording you can enjoy the last two movements of the Piano Concerto No. 5,
12:26
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‘From the New World’ is the title of Antonín Dvorák’s ninth and final symphony, which has proven to be his most popular. He completed the symphony in 1893 while he was serving as director of the National Conservatory of Music of America. For this piece, Dvorák was inspired by the music of America and by the Afro-American spirituals he heard there. He was convinced that the so-called ‘negro spiritual’ would lie at the basis of the future American approach to composition. The Symphony No. 9 was received with applause after each movement: the absolute peak in the career of the Czech composer. Today’s broadcast is part of a series of all nine Dvorák Symphonies, which were performed by the Czech Philharmonic under the baton of the Czech conductor Jirí Belohlávek in 2014. Belohlávek won the Czech National Conducting Competition in 1970. After this, he served as guest conductor of the Czech Philharmonic for two years. Afterwards, Belohlávek was often found in Prague; moreover, he was guest conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and the BBC Symphony Orchestra. In 2010 it was announced that he would return to the Czech Philharmonic as principal conductor, which resulted in in this string beautiful performances of Dvorák’s symphonies.
14:06
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In 2009 music lovers all over the world celebrate the 200th birthday of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, one of the most important artists of the 19th century. On February 3rd, 2009 (exactly 200 years after his birth) the city of Leipzig celebrates its famous citizen with a festive Gala Concert from the Gewandhaus zu Leipzig. The Gewandhausorchester plays under the baton of its Musical Director Riccardo Chailly and performs Mendelssohn’s "Trumpet-Overture", the "Scottish Symphony" and - as a highlight - the Piano Concerto No. 1 with star pianist Lang Lang.
15:35
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In 2001, the world-famous Berlin Philharmonic’s annual Europakonzert took place at a very unusual location: the Hagia Irene in Istanbul. This Byzantine church, which dates back to the 4th century, is the oldest one of the city. On the programme: Joseph Haydns ‘Symphony No. 94’ ‘the Surprise’, Mozart’s first flute concerto with soloist Emmanuel Pahud, and Hector Berlioz’s ‘Symphonie fantastique’.
BRAVA Stingray ZÍTRA
12:09
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The ‘Dante Sonata’ forms part of the second installment of Franz Liszt’s ‘Années de p
12:27
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When Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his wife made a stopover in Linz on their trip from Vienna to Salzburg in 1783 and the local count found out about this, the composer was invited to perform a concert. Mozart of course could not refuse, but had a problem: he had not brought a single symphony with him. There was nothing else he could do than write a new piece. This he did: in the ridiculously short time of four days he composed his Symphony No. 36, that since carries the nickname ‘Linz’. The hurry Mozart was in cannot be heard in the least it is a beautiful symphony that is still much-loved. In this broadcast: the second movement.
12:34
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Goethes play ‘Egmont’ undoubtedly appealed to Ludwig van Beethoven – a fight for freedom. It was the great subject of his only opera, Fidelio. ‘Egmont’ tells the story of the Spanish occupation of The Netherlands in the Eighty Years’ War and of the trials and tribulations of the people of the Dutch provinces. The Catholic Count of Egmont, loyal to Spain, pleads for tolerance but instead Spanish King Philip II sends the Duke of Alva. The Iron Duke eventually takes Egmont prisoner and beheads him. Beethoven wrote theatre music for the complete play, but the overture is by far the most famous part. Performers: Claudio Abbado, Berlin Philharmonic.
13:51
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‘Recuerdos de la Alhambra’ (Memories of the Alhambra) is a classical guitar piece composed by the Spanish composer and guitarist Francisco Tárrega (1852-1909). The piece, composed in Granada in 1896, applies the classical guitar tremolo technique. It shares its title with the Spanish translation of Washington Irving's 1832 book, ‘Tales of the Alhambra’, written during the author's four-year stay in Spain. The piece is performed by the Chinese guitar player Xuefei Yang.
14:14
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As an integral part of the official Nobel week, the world’s most renowned artists are gathering each year to pay tribute to the Nobel laureates. This concert is a special highlight in the series with Martha Argerich performing Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G Major under Yuri Temirkanov, this time leading the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. The programme also includes two Suites of Prokofiev’s 'Romeo and Juliet'.
15:34
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The Berliner Philharmoniker and Lang Lang under the baton of Sir Simon Rattle
BRAVA Stingray ČTVRTEK 19.10.
12:02
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Even though the instrumental make-up of the ‘Bachianas Brasileiras’ varies greatly among its parts, Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos interconnected the nine suites thematically. Villa-Lobos composed the first part of the set in 1930, when he returned to Brazil after a long and very successful stay in Paris. The nationalist government led by Getulio Vargas was in need of nationalist pieces, of which the Bachianas Brasileiras are an excellent example. Through these suites, Villa-Lobos wanted to show the similarities between Brazilian music and the compositions of Johann Sebastian Bach. His Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5 was written for soprano and an ensemble of at least eight cellos. Performers: Ana Maria Martínez, Berlin Philharmonic, Gustavo Dudamel (conductor).
12:14
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Unlike his prior symphonies, Anton
12:29
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Who could imagine that a failed job application would lead to some of the most beautiful classical music ever written? Employed by Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, an unsatisfied Johann Sebastian Bach craved a career change in 1721. Wishing to join the court of Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg, Bach presented him with six new concertos in the hopes of securing a position. Unfortunately, Christian Ludwig never even thanked the composer for his majestic and superbly beautiful work. Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 is an exuberant four-movement composition. Originally written for the clarion, a precursor of the modern trumpet.
13:33
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In James O’Callaghan's Indices or: Kosuth Variations, the musicians play found objects as well as their own instruments. O’Callaghan explores a trend that was also felt in his earlier pieces: the blurring of boundaries between music and sound, music and non-music. O’Callaghan (*1988) is concerned with the philosophical problem of universals. He explains: "What is the relationship between an entity and other entities just like it? To what extent can different chairs be identical?" This refers to the American conceptual artist Joseph Kosuth, who placed three representations of chairs next to each other in a gallery: an actual chair, a dictionary definition of the chair, and a photograph of that same chair. In Indices or: Kosuth Variations, the composer tries to deconstruct the relationship between musical documents (such as scores), recordings, objects (such as instruments), mundane utensils, and the act of performing. O’Callaghan says, "It is a metaphor for the relationship between our observation of physical reality and the imagined non-physical world of forms (or ideas) that this reality is supposed to resemble. The separation between the abstract and the concrete in western philosophy has filtered through into the assumptions regarding our musical culture. Indices or: Kosuth Variations hinges on these conjectures; whether celebrated as aesthetic apogees or disrespectfully dismantled."
14:04
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The concerts of the newly established Lucerne Festival Orchestra with Claudio Abbado as its conductor made triumphal headlines worldwide: from "the miracle of Lucerne" (Tagesspiegel) to "superbe et éph
15:50
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Works: Die Lorelei, S532, Sonata in B minor, S178. Pianist Mariam Batsashvili studied successively at the E. Mikeladze Central Music School in Tbilisi with Natalia Natsvlishvili and at the Hochschule für Musik Franz Liszt in Weimar with Grigory Gruzman. She won prizes from various competitions such as the First Prize at the International Franz Liszt Competition for Young Pianists in Weimar in 2011 and Second Prize at the María Herrero International Piano Competition in Granada in 2012. Aside from her native country Georgia, Mariam Batsashvili has performed in such countries as Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Russia, Israel, South Africa and China, both in recitals and with orchestras. She was a soloist with the Erfurt Philharmonisches Orchester and with the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra on numerous occasions.
BRAVA Stingray PÁTEK 20.10.
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This Sonata for Violin and Harpsichord No. 1 BWV 1014 is the fifth out of the set of sonatas Johann Sebastian Bach composed before 1725, probably during his time as chapel master in Köthen. Presumably, he wrote these sonatas for Prince Leopold and later adapted them for further use in Leipzig. Maybe this is why these pieces are well playable for amateurs, while every sonata still has the finesse that can offer a challenge to professional musicians. The different pieces are meant to be a set, just like the Brandenburg concertos. Performers: Frank Peter Zimmermann (violin), Enrico Pace (piano)
12:25
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‘Ta-ta-ta-taa’. It is quite possibly the most famous opening sequence, to one of the most famous symphonies ever written. It has become impossible to think of concert halls today without Beethoven’s ‘Fifth’, but for a symphony this popular it had a rather disastrous opening night. December 22nd 1808 the piece was premiered, alongside the Sixth Symphony, the Fantasy in C minor for Piano, Chorus, and Orchestra, and also the Fourth Piano Concerto and parts of the Mass in C. A concert marathon, in fact, and truly exhausting for the underpaid musicians. Vienna at that time was experiencing a gruesomely cold winter, meaning even the audience had a hard time in the unheated concert hall. Beethoven’s biographer Anton Schindler noted: "the reception accorded to these works was not as desired, and probably no better than the author himself had expected. The public was not endowed with the necessary degree of comprehension for such extraordinary music, and the performance left a great deal to be desired." In this broadcast: the second movement.
12:38
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After hearing the beautiful sounds of Johannes Brahms’s Symphony No. 3, Antonín Dvorák was inspired to start working on a new symphony of his own. Around that time, the Philharmonic Society of London commissioned a new symphony from Dvorák, allowing him to be nominated for a honourary membership. He based his symphony on several of the conflicts people encounter over the course of a lifetime. These conflicts were both of a political and a personal nature. The symphony has a very patriotic and nationalist character. According to the critics, Dvorák’s Symphony No. 7 represents his finest effort, along with his Symphonies No. 8 and 9. Today’s broadcast is part of a series of all nine Dvorák Symphonies, which were performed by the Czech Philharmonic under the baton of the Czech conductor Jirí Belohlávek in 2014. Belohlávek won the Czech National Conducting Competition in 1970. After this, he served as guest conductor of the Czech Philharmonic for two years. Afterwards, Belohlávek was often found in Prague; moreov
14:05
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The Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra started its season with a great Gala Concert conducted by music director Gustavo Dudamel. As special guest: star tenor Juan Diego Flórez. The programme includes popular arias by Rossini as well as famous songs by Latin-American composers. Programme: Rossini, Overture to ‘La gazza ladra’, Overture to ‘Semiramide’, ‘La Speranza piu soave’ from Semiramide, Overture to Guillaume Tell, ‘Asil ereditaire’ from Guillaume Tell Granada (arr. Florez),’ La flor de la canela’ Mancayo,’ Huapango’ Grever (arr. Guinovart), ‘Jurame’ Gutierrez (arr. Pena), ‘Alma Ilanera’ Marquez, Danzon No. 2 Encores: Verdi, ‘La donna e mobile’ from Rigoletto Gounod: ‘Ah, leve toi soleil’ from Romeo and Juliette. Location: Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles
15:35
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Piano Concerto No. 1 in E-flat major, S.124. Pianist Mariam Batsashvili studied successively at the E. Mikeladze Central Music School in Tbilisi with Natalia Natsvlishvili and at the Hochschule für Musik Franz Liszt in Weimar with Grigory Gruzman. She won prizes from various competitions such as the First Prize at the International Franz Liszt Competition for Young Pianists in Weimar in 2011 and Second Prize at the María Herrero International Piano Competition in Granada in 2012. Aside from her native country Georgia, Mariam Batsashvili has performed in such countries as Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Russia, Israel, South Africa and China, both in recitals and with orchestras. She was a soloist with the Erfurt Philharmonisches Orchester and with the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra on numerous occasions.
15:54
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The philosophy behind ‘Les Salons de Musique’ is to bring about original and exclusive meetings between preeminent musicians. These meetings take place in unusual and intimate venues. The musicians share their emotions with each other and with the audience: a recipe for unforgettable moments. ‘Ardeo’ (‘I burn’ in Latin) is not only the name of this quartet; it’s also the creed with which the four young women approach their repertoire. Their success proves them right. The Ardeo Quartet, founded in 2001 at the Conservatoire national supérieur de musique et de danse de Paris, has become one of France’s foremost ensembles. A perfect artistic sensitivity, which is firmly rooted in an uninterrupted collaboration, and a search for balance and mutual harmony lies at the root of the quartet’s many international competition successes: in Bordeaux, in Moscow, in Bologna, in Melbourne... Heavily inspired by powerful musical characters such as Rainer Schmidt (Hagen Quartet), Ferenc Rados, and Eberhard Feltz, the Ardeo Quartet is currently regularly joining forces with composers such as Kajia Saariaho and Pascal Dusapin.
BRAVA Stingray SOBOTA 21.10.
12:08
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Jean Paul’s novel ‘Titan’, in which an artistically gifted young man, driven by his failure to find his way in society, eventually commits suicide in despair, inspired Gustav Mahler to compose his Symphony No. 1. The work did not come easily to Mahler: he composed it between 1887 and 1888 when he, in his twenties, was working as a conductor at the Oper Leipzig. The first version of the work was considered as a symphonic poem in two parts, as its titles told a specific musical story. This original version premiered in Budapest in 1898, but it did not go down well. Mahler decided to revise his work: he left out the expressionist titles and cut the second part (Blumine). This results in a wonderful symphony, full of musical references. The opening part quotes one of Mahler's earlier compositions (Ging heut' morgens übers Feld from Lieder eines Fahrenden Gesellen), the second movement is an Austrian ländler (a folk dance), and the third part refers to a very well-known melody: ‘Brother John'. All in all, this Symphony No. 1 marks an incredible achievement for a composer this young. During this broadcast, the third movement.
12:20
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Though it was the premiere of his Fourth Symphony that earned Anton Bruckner his status as composer in Vienna, none of his pieces would exceed his Seventh Symphony in E major in success. Artur Nikisch led the Gewandhaus Orchestra Leipzig its first performance on the 30th of January 1884, and in January 1885 the piece was first performed in Vienna by Hans Richter and the Wiener Philharmoniker. The second movement of the symphony is inseparable from Bruckner’s idol, Richard Wagner the adagio was written with Wagner’s death in mind and for the first time Bruckner made use of the Wagner tuba. In this broadcast: the second movement.
14:05
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On May 5, 2011, Carnegie Hall commemorated its 120th anniversary with an all-star gala concert featuring conductor Alan Gilbert and the New York Philharmonic and special guests: pianist Emanuel Ax, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, violinist Gil Shaham, and the four-time Tony Award-winning singer and actress Audra McDonald. The eclectic, crowd pleasing program is set to include Beethoven’s Triple Concerto in C major, Op. 56, performed by Ax, Ma, and Shaham, a selection of Duke Ellington songs – including ‘Solitude,’ ‘Sophisticated Lady,’ ‘On a Turquoise Cloud,’ and ‘It Don’t Mean a Thing if it Ain’t Got That Swing’ -performed by McDonald, and full performances of Antonin Dvorak’s Carnival Overture and George Gershwin’s ‘An American in Paris’
15:27
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Mary Carewe (*1963) has been wowing audiences around the world in a wide variety of concert programmes - with orchestras and ensembles, as well as in cabaret performances. In the United Kingdom, Mary performs regularly with The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Manchester’s ‘The Hallé’, the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, The Philharmonia, and The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, in concerts such as 'The Music of Burt Bacharach’, ‘The Best of Rodgers and Hammerstein’, ‘La Vie en Rose’, ‘Songs of the 60’s’ and ‘Oscar Winners’, while she has taken ‘The Music of James Bond’ to the United States of America, Australia, Asia, and around Europe. She has been a guest artist with ensembles such as The Matrix Ensemble, the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group, the Psappha ensemble, Manchester Camerata, Sinfonia ViVa and London Sinfonietta, and is a regular member of the Sheridan Ensemble. With her own band of musicians, she has presented ‘First ladies of song - from Joni to Adele' around the United Kingdom. In this broadcast, Carewe and her pianist Philip Mayers charm the Parisian audience of the Théâtre du Châtelet with the music of Kurt Weill, including such timeless classics as ‘I’m a stranger here myself’, ‘Surabaya Johnny’, ‘Buddy on the nightshift’, ‘Speak low’, ‘Nannas Lied’, ‘My ship’, ‘Je ne t’aime plus’, and ‘The saga of Jenny’.
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When the Berlin Philharmonic celebrated its 125th year, the orchestra used the anniversary as an opportunity to examine a rather unknown chapter in its history: the years under the rule of the National Socialists (between 1933 and 1945). The centre stage is taken by the musicians, the people and their individual fates. Thanks to contemporary witnesses from the orchestra and its fringes who are still alive today, and thanks also to extensive and until now unapprised archive materials, it is possible to gain an insight into this microcosm: where does the thin line run separating autonomy from entanglement, innocence from guilt? A chapter from the history of Germany and Berlin, as gripping as it is volatile, comes to life once more. The film made by Enrique Sánchez Lansch seeks out witnesses from all over the world: forgotten (or carefully concealed) footage of propaganda events such as the Nuremberg Rallies or the opening ceremony of the 1936 Olympics. It visits the relatives of the four Jewish members who were removed from the orchestra, the descendants of the musicians who joined the NSDAP and those who suddenly appeared at rehearsals in the SA (Storm troopers) uniform.
19:39
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The further into the cycle of Ludwig van Beethoven’s 32 piano sonatas you get, the more complex and dark the music gets. Especially the very last few can each be called absolute masterpieces. This piano sonata, however, is often wrongfully overshadowed by its predecessor, Piano Sonata No. 29 ‘Hammerklavier’, and its immediate follow-up No. 32, the final piano sonata Beethoven wrote. This sonata is the middle of a set of three (Op. 109-111) that Beethoven wrote for Berliner publishing company Schlesinger.
19:45
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Gustav Mahler’s third symphony is, with its unequalled length of approximately 95 minutes, an exciting, mysterious, overbearing and moving piece. In the six parts of this marvellous symphony, Mahler expresses his musical vision on nature, and the place of mankind in nature. The composer uses, much in the same way as he did in his second symphony, material from his earlier 'Wunderhorn Liederen', closing the fourth movement with a beautiful alto solo set to a Friedrich Nietzsche poem, and closing the fifth movement with a mixed female-boys-choir. The symphony originally consisted of seven movements, but Mahler cut the seventh part eventually and used it as the last movement for his fourth symphony. Performed and recorded in 2007 by Claudio Abbado and the Lucerne Festival Orchestra, the Arnold Schoenberg Choir, the Wien Tölzer Knabenchoir, and mezzo-soprano Anna Larson. During this broadcast, the fourth movement.
19:55
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All of the compositions Mexican Silvestre Revueltas wrote in the short span of his life were full of energy and humor. He was a close friend of Carlos Chávez, another great Mexican name in music, and it was Chávez that in 1929 convinced him to come back to Mexico. Revueltas had studied in Chicago and stuck around since. When back in Mexico, he worked as assistant-conductor of the Orquesta Sinfónico de México, as a teacher and as a solo violinist. He wrote a lot of music for Mexican films and was an active supporter of the labour movement. In 1940, Revueltas died, officially from lung cancer but it was a public secret that he had drunk himself to death. In this broadcast you can listen to ‘Sensemaya’, one of his best known pieces.
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The Théâtre Impérial du Châtelet opened its doors for the very first time on 19 August 1862, in the presence of the Empress Eugénie. Seating 2,500 people and boasting a stage of 24 by 35 meters, it was the largest venue of its type in Paris at the time. It was an exceptional piece of work, noted for its outstanding sound quality: to achieve optimal sound reflection, parquet, wood-framed seating, and a dome glass roof were used. Pianist Jay Gottlieb was born in New York, where he was an honours graduate of the High School of Performing Arts – simultaneously studying at the Juilliard School in New York. He received a Master of Arts degree from Harvard University, where he performed and organized concerts and taught piano, composition and harmony. For many years, he worked closely with Nadia Boulanger in Paris, as well as with pianist Robert Casadesus, and composers Olivier Messiaen, Pierre Boulez, John Cage, György Ligeti, and Betsy Jolas. Gottlieb has won numerous prizes and he performs regularly at music festivals all over the world.
18:14
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Russian composer Nikolai Medtner’s musicality already showed at an early age: he was only twelve when he was admitted to the Moscow conservatory. In his early years it was mostly his piano playing that caught everyone’s attention only later on he started dedicating more time to composing. As pianist-composer, he left a large number of piano pieces of which these ‘fairy tales’ are a prime example. Russian composer Boris Berezovsky, performing in this broadcast, is one of the greatest advocates of Medtner’s music.
18:41
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After hearing the beautiful sounds of Johannes Brahms’s Symphony No. 3, Antonín Dvorák was inspired to start working on a new symphony of his own. Around that time, the Philharmonic Society of London commissioned a new symphony from Dvorák, allowing him to be nominated for a honourary membership. He based his symphony on several of the conflicts people encounter over the course of a lifetime. These conflicts were both of a political and a personal nature. The symphony has a very patriotic and nationalist character. According to the critics, Dvorák’s Symphony No. 7 represents his finest effort, along with his Symphonies No. 8 and 9. Today’s broadcast is part of a series of all nine Dvorák Symphonies, which were performed by the Czech Philharmonic under the baton of the Czech conductor Jirí Belohlávek in 2014. Belohlávek won the Czech National Conducting Competition in 1970. After this, he served as guest conductor of the Czech Philharmonic for two years. Afterwards, Belohlávek was often found in Prague; moreover, he was guest conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and the BBC Symphony Orchestra. In 2010 it was announced that he would return to the Czech Philharmonic as principal conductor, which resulted in in this string beautiful performances of Dvorák’s symphonies.
19:27
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The South-African guitarists Derek Gripper takes center stage in this episode of ‘Gitaarsalon’. Gripper is known for his innovative guitar versions of the kora repertoire, which was originally played on the African string instrument of that name. Yet Gripper is inspired too by the Brazilian composer Egberto Gismonti, the Indian ‘tabla’ music, African folk music, or reworkings of Johann Sebastian Bach’s compositions for solo violin. Enjoy Gripper's extraordinary, many-faceted concert, recorded live at the Enkhuizen Gitaarsalon!
BRAVA Stingray ČTVRTEK 19.10.
16:25
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The Netherlands Chamber Orchestra commissioned violinist Tim Kliphuis, internationally known for his genre-crossing approach to music, to write a new version of Antonio Vivaldi's ‘Four Seasons’. Kliphuis choose to take improvisation as his starting point; at the same time, he intended to leave the best-known Vivaldi themes and chords in, as they give the piece its wonderful energy. The result is a fresh and exciting interpretation that never loses sight of the original. Each season has a different character: the freshness of spring is reflected by the use of Irish and Norwegian traditional music; the summer heat can be heard in the American jazz and funk rhythms; the autumn includes a galloping safari hunt in South-Africa and the ice-cold winter warms up with the energy of Russian gypsy music. For each movement, Kliphuis has a metropole in mind which he visited on his previous concert tours. You’re about to witness a truly genre-crossing spectacle!
16:59
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The International Vocal Competition’s-Hertogenbosch (IVC) was founded in 1954. Since then, it has been the Netherlands’ only international classical vocal competition featuring two categories: oratorio and Lied. This unique social institute is a vital part of the cultural life of the province of Noord-Brabant and the city of ’s-Hertogenbosch. Over the course of its existence, the IVC has built on its national and international prestige, with world-class winners such as Elly Ameling, Cora Burggraaf, Thomas Hampson, Howard Haskin, Robert Holl, Nelly Miricioiu, Jard van Nes, Lenneke Ruiten, Wolfgang Schöne and Elzbieta Szmytka.
17:26
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The year 1812 was a busy one for the by then already famous but deaf Ludwig van Beethoven. He finally met Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (another German celebrity) but was disappointed by his personality, had an eventful love life and wrote the famous letter to his anonymous ‘Unsterbliche Geliebte’ (Immortal Beloved) and also tried to interfere in the life of his youngest brother, who had an affair with one of the maids. Amidst all this he still found the time to compose some new pieces, among which was his Seventh Symphony. The piece was first performed in 1813 at a charity event for wounded soldiers, by a rather special orchestra: Louis Spohr for instance was one of the violinists, and Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Giacomo Meyerbeer and Antonio Salieri were also among those in the orchestra.
18:03
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The suite from George Frideric Handel’s ‘Water Music’ was first heard during an aristocratic boating trip on River Thames in 1717. Baron Von Kielmansegg commissioned Handel to compose this suite, as the Baron was organizing this barge excursion to accompany King George I’s supper. Handel had been in the King’s employ from 1710 to 1713, and Von Kielmansegg was sorry to see Handel leave in 1713. He aimed to bring Handel to the King’s attention once more by means of the ‘Water Music Suite’. The suite consists of three movements, each of which are subdivided into smaller parts. The suite opens with a French Overture and contains minuets and a bourrée, a Baroque dance of French origin. The King enjoyed Handel’s ‘Water Music’ tremendously, and the piece was performed more than once during the barge excursion. The second and third suites are often performed together, because no instructions survived about the order in which the suite was to be played. There is a marked difference in mood between the Suite No. 2 and 3: the Suite No. 2 is upbeat, partly thanks to the trumpets, whereas the Suite No. 3 is more intimate.
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The great Israeli-born violinist Itzhak Perlman has already left a huge number of sound recordings of his interpretations; but it adds an extra dimension to be able to watch him execute, for instance, the brilliant spiccato bowing in Camille Saint-Saëns’s ‘Introduction and Rondo capriccioso’. A master of the French style through his teacher Ivan Galamian, Perlman at 25 is seen in the first full flush of his talent. Ten years later, the mature soloist shows his total command of the bitter-sweet romanticism of Elgar's massive, virtuosic concerto.
19:43
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Thanks to his antics at the piano, his unquestionable love for the works of Johann Sebastian Bach, and his unbelievable technique, it is only logical that the young French pianist David Fray has often been compared to pianist Glenn Gould. How true this comparison rings is evident from this concert that features music by J. S. Bach alone. In this broadcast: 'Partita No. 6 in E minor, BWV 830', part 3.
19:49
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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart must have had the great success of his first concert series of 1785 in mind when he organized his second towards the end of that year. During these lucrative concerts for the people of Vienna, Mozarts own works were performed, and often he would take centre stage playing the piano as well. With this aim in mind Mozart wrote his Piano Concerto No. 22, but it probably had its first performance during a benefit for widows and orphans of deceased musicians. In this broadcast: the second movement.
19:59
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Johann Strauss’ operetta about a practical joke turned fantastically wrong is a riot of spell-binding Viennese music. The musicians of the Cleveland Orchestra show that Americans can waltz as well as anyone. That being said, it is surely no hindrance that Franz Welser-Möst of Austrian origin conducts the orchestra…
BRAVA Stingray PÁTEK 20.10.
16:58
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With this concert, Yutaka Sado makes his Philharmonic debut. He will be the first Japanese to conduct the renowned orchestra since Seiji Ozawa several years ago. Critics have unanimously hailed Yutaka Sado as one of the most enthralling and charismatic conductors of the new generation. Sado, the long-time assistant of Leonard Bernstein and Seiji Ozawa, has certainly earned his many awards. In this broadcast: Dmitri Shostakovich’s 'Symphony No. 5'.
17:53
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The documentary La Spira zooms in on the project Spira Mirabilis. Spira Mirabilis is an extraordinary new project drawing together some of Europe's finest young players. It offers a radical new approach to the classical music concert. Mostly in their 20s, practising and performing without a conductor (and without any fee!), these highly-skilled players break down the traditional barriers between performer and audience. The musical experiment developed by this group of young and talented musicians is the main theme of this documentary, which attempts to focus on the ideal embedded in this manner of "playing music together", to follow the practice in the course of work sessions and scenes from collective life.
19:23
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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s opera about Figaro, who would like to marry his Susanna but is blocked in his intentions by his employer the Count, has fascinated audiences throughout the centuries. This broadcast shows the recitative and Count Almaviva's aria, as sung by exceptional American baritone Thomas Hampson.
19:28
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,,The title Nocturnes is to be interpreted here in a general and, more particularly, in a decorative sense. Therefore, it is not meant to designate the usual form of the Nocturne, but rather all the various impressions and the special effects of light that the word suggests." The ‘Nocturnes’ by Claude Debussy is a suite consisting of three parts, of which in this broadcast the middle one will be shown: Nuages (clouds), F
BRAVA Stingray SOBOTA 21.10.
16:22
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The Nieuwe Philharmonie Utrecht is an orchestra that wasn’t there before. Not just in Utrecht, but in all of the Dutch musical landscape. The orchestra can hold its own, both nationally and internationally, because of its choice of instruments and repertoire. The orchestra is dedicated to the performance of the music of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. At the core of the NPUtrecht’s repertoire are the symphonies of Johannes Brahms. Apart from its annual ‘Messiah’ and St Matthew’s Passion, the orchestra performs a Brahms symphony. Johannes Brahms composed his Symphony No. 1 at age 43. This is partly due to Brahms’ critical attitude towards his own work: many of his drafts found their way into the bin. Brahms felt a great pressure: the audience had stamped him as a worthy heir and successor to Ludwig van Beethoven. When writing his Symphony No. 1, he needed to take Beethoven’s oeuvre into account, yet he also needed to find a new direction. See for yourself whether he succeeded…
17:06
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Originally, Arnold Schönberg intended to turn his ‘Pelléas und Melisande’ into an opera, but quite early on he decided it was to be a purely instrumental piece the composer thought the piece would turn out better when unrestricted by lyrics. The composition’s subject came from a hint Richard Strauss gave Schoenberg, pointing to the play by Maurice Maeterlinck of the same name. It takes a large orchestra to perform this composition, but it is full of details nonetheless. The main characters in the story for instance (Pelléas, Melissande and Golaud) all have their own theme.
17:47
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Murray Perahia has often been described as an aristocrat of the piano, and with good reason. There is, however, nothing exclusive or intellectual, let alone academic, about his playing. His commanding vision, like his supremely polished virtuosity, is complemented by a luminous intelligence and a poetic sensitivity which has been his trademark from the start, embracing equally the lyric and the epic just as Beethoven did who combined the Classic and Romantic like no other. Perahia’s Beethoven, with its formal balance, crystalline textures, eloquent phrasing, unfailingly beautiful tone and spacious grasp of large-scale structure, allows us to eavesdrop on the development of a towering genius as he ushers in the birth of an era.
18:56
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A few days after the first performance of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20, the composer’s father wrote to his daughter Nannerl: ,,I heard an excellent new piano concerto by Wolfgang, […] the copyist was still at work when we got there". The story goes that Mozart completed the concerto on the 10th of February 1785 and performed the premiere in Vienna the very next day. Young Ludwig van Beethoven loved this concerto and played it regularly. He was not the only one to admire the concerto according to conductor and pianist Daniel Barenboim this piece was Joseph Stalin’s favourite composition. In this broadcast: the second movement.
19:04
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Every year, the closing concert of the Pianoscope Festival is a unique moment, in which all musicians who took part in any of the Festival’s concerts and masterclasses come together for a majestic conclusion to the festivities. In this broadcast: Johannes Brahms’s ‘Brahms - Liebeslieder-Walzer’.
19:15
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Who could imagine that a failed job application would lead to some of the most beautiful classical music ever written? Employed by Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, an unsatisfied Johann Sebastian Bach craved a career change in 1721. Wishing to join the court of Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg, Bach presented him with six new concertos in the hopes of securing a position. Unfortunately, Christian Ludwig never even thanked the composer for his majestic and superbly beautiful work. Concerto No. 5 employs a standard line-up of recorder, violin, and harpsichord.
19:45
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After hearing the beautiful sounds of Johannes Brahms’s Symphony No. 3, Antonín Dvorák was inspired to start working on a new symphony of his own. Around that time, the Philharmonic Society of London commissioned a new symphony from Dvorák, allowing him to be nominated for a honourary membership. He based his symphony on several of the conflicts people encounter over the course of a lifetime. These conflicts were both of a political and a personal nature. The symphony has a very patriotic and nationalist character. According to the critics, Dvorák’s Symphony No. 7 represents his finest effort, along with his Symphonies No. 8 and 9. Today’s broadcast is part of a series of all nine Dvorák Symphonies, which were performed by the Czech Philharmonic under the baton of the Czech conductor Jirí Belohlávek in 2014. Belohlávek won the Czech National Conducting Competition in 1970. After this, he served as guest conductor of the Czech Philharmonic for two years. Afterwards, Belohlávek was often found in Prague; moreover, he was guest conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and the BBC Symphony Orchestra. In 2010 it was announced that he would return to the Czech Philharmonic as principal conductor, which resulted in in this string beautiful performances of Dvorák’s symphonies.
19:55
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The year 1812 was a busy year for the well-known but deaf composer Ludwig van Beethoven. At last, Beethoven got the chance to meet that other famous German, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, but Goethe’s personality proved a disappointed to Beethoven. The composer was carrying on a hectic love life: in 1812 he wrote his famous letter to an anonymous ‘Unsterbliche Geliebte’ (‘Immortal Beloved’). Moreover, he was getting involved in the life of his younger brother, who was infatuated with a housekeeper. Yet despite his activities, Beethoven found the time to compose several new works, among which his Seventh Symphony. The piece was first performed in 1813, at a concert for the benefit of wounded soldiers; if ever an orchestra was an all-star ensemble, the orchestra that graced the stage that night certainly deserved that name: Louis Spohr was one of the violinists, and among the other orchestra players were Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Giacomo Meyerbeer and Antonio Salieri. In this broadcast: the third movement. Conductor: Claudio Abbado Performers: Berlin Philharmonic Location: Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Rome, 2001
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In 1943, after his health had deteriorated over a very short period of time, Béla Bartók was diagnosed with leukaemia. Almost three years earlier he had escaped World War II and left Europe for the United States, but there he felt isolated artistically and had financial problems on top of that. Recognition he only received for his piano playing, but due to his bad health he could not perform anymore after January 1943. The Hungarian composer was emotionally and physically bankrupt. He was in hospital when Serge Koussevitzky, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, came to ask him to compose a large orchestral piece. Bartók did not know the assignment was financed by his fellow emigrants and good friends violinist Joseph Szigeti and conductor Fritz Reiner. The assignment, to Bartók, came at a crucial stage in his life: he recovered his energy and managed to finish his Concerto for Orchestra within seven weeks. The premiere on December 1st 1944 in Boston was a great success and Bartók’s music now finally received recognition in the United States as well. New requests for compositions were made, but Bartók’s health once again failed him: he died in September 1945. In this broadcast: the third movement. Conductor: Pierre Boulez Performers: Berliner Philharmoniker Location: Hieronymites Monastery, Lisbon Year: 2003
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From the Gasteig in Munich: Germany's most popular Tenor Jonas Kaufmann presents an evening with the most famous German operatic arias. Here, he sings 'Langer trag ich nicht die Qualen' from Von Weber's opera 'Der Freischütz'.
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It must have been quite a concert: at 6:30 PM on December 22, 1808, the poorly heated Theater an der Wien provided the backdrop for the premiere of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4. His Choral Fantasy, his concert aria ‘Ah! perfido’, selections from the Mass in C and his Fifth and Sixth Symphonies were performed. Each and every one of these compositions is a masterpiece; their influence on music history has proven enormous. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6, ‘Pastorale’, is a text book example of programme music: Beethoven cleverly sketches the peace and quiet of the country life. In this broadcast: the third movement.
20:38
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The Czech composer Antonín Dvorák dedicated his Symphony No. 6 to Hans Richter, who at that time was the conducter of the Wiener Philharmoniker. It is no coincidence Dvorák had the Wiener Philharmoniker in mind when he composed his Symphony No. 6. He even used German classical-romantic influences, interweaving his own Czech musicality. Dvorák did all this, hoping that Richter and the Wiener Philharmoniker would premiere his composition. Unfortunately, Richter was not charmed by the idea. Moreover, the orchestra was overworked at the time. The premi
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The 1997 Berlin Gala was dedicated to Georges Bizet’s Carmen with all works somehow connected to the opera. Featuring star soloists, the Berliner Philharmoniker and Italian conductor Claudio Abbado, the program included selections from Carmen itself, Sergei Rachmaninov’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Pablo de Sarasate’s Carmen Fantasy op. 25, Maurice Ravel’s Rhapsodie Espagnol, Manuel de Falla’s Ritual Fire Dance, and Johannes Brahms’s Hungarian Dance No. 5 in G minor.
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The documentary Sacred Stage is set against the backdrop of Saint Petersburg’s magical White Nights Festival. The film features the best in Russian symphonic music, ballet and opera at Russia’s premier theatre - the Mariinsky, also known as the Kirov. Sacred Stage explores what the theatre has meant to Russian and Soviet culture, and how it has maintained its artistic excellence through war, revolution and the collapse of Communism… No documentary about Russia’s music scene is complete without a look at the life and work of the Mariinsky’s artistic and theatre director, maestro Valery Gergiev, as well as the scene’s other characters - artists, socialites, financiers, politicians and celebrities.
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Because his ‘Merry Wives of Windsor’ is the only one of his pieces that is performed with any regularity in our day, Otto Nicolai is seen by many as a ‘one composition composer’. And even though this opera may rightfully be his most-played, the other compositions are also definitely worth the listen. Because of his own high expectations and his early death, he did not put many titles to his name, but the pieces he did compose are very well put together. Nicolai also owes fame to another noticeable feat: when he was working for the Hofoper in Vienna he organised instrumental concerts, a practice that would lead to the foundation of the Wiener Philharmoniker.
20:09
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Star tenor Juan Diego Flórez sings 'Principe piů non sei' from Rossini's opera 'La Cenerentola', accompanied by Gustavo Dudamel and the LA Philharmonic.
20:16
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Robert Schumann once described Ludwig van Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony as ‘a slender Greek maiden between two Norse giants’. The ‘two Norse giants’ referred to the Third and Fifth Symphonies, which have an almost mythical reputation. Unintentionally, his description suggested that Beethoven’s ‘even’ Symphonies are not as profound as his ‘odd’ Symphonies. Beethoven received his commission for this Symphony because of another, ‘even’ Symphony. In 1806, Count Franz von Oppersdorf responded enthusiastically to Beethoven’s Second Symphony, and promptly offered the composer a large sum of money for a new one. In October of the same year, the Count received ‘his’ Symphony. Although Schumann’s description might seem accurate on a first hearing, the intense and tragic introduction of the Fourth Symphony illustrates that this Beethoven composition, too, is not in the least short of heartfelt emotion. In this broadcast: the third movement. Conductor: Claudio Abbado Performers: Berlin Philharmonic Location: Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Rome, 2001
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Jules Massenet was one of the most celebrated opera composers of his day, which earned him much money and fame. Nowadays, he is most remembered because of his operas Manon and Werther, and of course this violin solo from his opera Thäis. Tha
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In 1854 young Johannes Brahms lived in Düsseldorf, where he helped his good friend Clara Schumann to look after her seven children. Her husband Robert Schumann, who was also Brahms’ mentor, had been admitted to an asylum after a failed attempted suicide earlier that year. It was in these circumstances that Brahms started on two sketches for a first symphony. One of these sketches in 1858 grew into his First Piano Concerto, but the second remained unused for many years. Because Brahms was an unbelievable perfectionist, he needed as many as 21 years to finish his first symphony. But this was not the only reason: friends of the composer and the audience expected Brahms to become the ‘heir’of Ludwig van Beethoven. An expectation that was not easy to fulfill and that caused some headaches. The piece’s premiere on November 4th 1876 was a great success: it was even labelled ‘Beethoven’s Tenth Symphony’. In this broadcast: the second movement.
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Featuring W. A. Mozart and Giuseppe Verdi, love is the theme of this 1998 New Year's Eve concert. Maestro Claudio Abbado selected two of the best Mozart interpreters, Christine Schäfer and Simon Keenlyside, for this traditionally meaningful event. Marcelo Álvarez from Argentina, who some compare to a young Domingo, sings highlights of the tenor repertoire, and Italian prima donna Mirella Freni tops the occasion with a breath-taking performance of the letter scene from Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's Eugen Onegin.
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Who could imagine that a failed job application would lead to some of the most beautiful classical music ever written? Employed by Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, an unsatisfied Johann Sebastian Bach craved a career change in 1721. Wishing to join the court of Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg, Bach presented him with six new concertos in the hopes of securing a position. Unfortunately, Christian Ludwig never even thanked the composer for his majestic and superbly beautiful work. Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 is an exuberant four-movement composition. Originally written for the clarion, a precursor of the modern trumpet, Concerto No. 2 is a challenge for today’s trumpeters. Concerto No. 3 is for three violins, three violas, three cellos and basso continuo accompaniment
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In 1943, after his health had deteriorated over a very short period of time, Béla Bartók was diagnosed with leukaemia. Almost three years earlier he had escaped World War II and left Europe for the United States, but there he felt isolated artistically and had financial problems on top of that. Recognition he only received for his piano playing, but due to his bad health he could not perform anymore after January 1943. The Hungarian composer was emotionally and physically bankrupt. He was in hospital when Serge Koussevitzky, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, came to ask him to compose a large orchestral piece. Bartók did not know the assignment was financed by his fellow emigrants and good friends violinist Joseph Szigeti and conductor Fritz Reiner. The assignment, to Bartók, came at a crucial stage in his life: he recovered his energy and managed to finish his Concerto for Orchestra within seven weeks. The premiere on December 1st 1944 in Boston was a great success and Bartók’s music now finally received recognition in the United States as well. New requests for compositions were made, but Bartók’s health once again failed him: he died in September 1945. In this broadcast: the first movement. Conductor: Pierre Boulez Performers: Berliner Philharmoniker Location: Hieronymites Monastery, Lisbon Year: 2003
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Ludwig van Beethoven was an exceptional pianist, perhaps that is why people tend to forget he was also a capable violinist. Although perhaps not a virtuoso, Beethoven loved the instrument and wrote no lesser than ten sonatas for it, several pieces of chamber music and of course the violin concerto. His ‘Two Romances for Violin and Orchestra’ stand out, because they are two pieces of a whole that are still very reminiscent of solo concertos. In this broadcast: the Second Romance.
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In between his many performances in 1779, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart still managed to find the time to compose a Sinfonia concertante for violin, viola and orchestra. On a tour through major European cities, among them Paris and Mannheim, the composer encountered many exciting new musical ideas and techniques. In Paris, the genre of the Sinfonia concertante (a blend of a solo concerto and a symphony)was at the time highly popular. Inspired by his time in Paris, Mozart decided to try his hand at this new genre, in which he was to compose four pieces. Unfortunately, this work for violin, viola and orchestra is the only one that has survived in its entirety. This program broadcasts its third part.
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In 1909, Claude Debussy was admitted by Gabriel Fauré to the Conseil Supérieur (Board of Directors) of the Parisian Conservatory. One of the first tasks connected to this admission was to supply the clarinet students with suitable exam pieces. This he did, composing a ‘Premi
BRAVA Stingray ČTVRTEK 19.10.
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‘Ta-ta-ta-taa’: quite possibly the most famous opening sequence, to one of the most famous symphonies ever written. It has become impossible to think of concert halls today without Beethoven’s ‘Fifth’, but for a symphony this popular it had a rather disastrous opening night. December 22nd 1808 the piece was premiered, alongside the Sixth Symphony, the Fantasy in C minor for Piano, Chorus, and Orchestra, and also the Fourth Piano Concerto and parts of the Mass in C. A concert marathon, in fact, and truly exhausting for the underpaid musicians. Vienna at that time was experiencing a gruesomely cold winter, meaning even the audience had a hard time in the unheated concert hall. Beethoven’s biographer Anton Schindler noted: "the reception accorded to these works was not as desired, and probably no better than the author himself had expected. The public was not endowed with the necessary degree of comprehension for such extraordinary music, and the performance left a great deal to be desired." In this broadcast: the first movement. Conductor: Claudio Abbado Performers: Berlin Philharmonic Location: Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Rome, 2001
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The International Vocal Competition’s-Hertogenbosch (IVC) was founded in 1954. Since then, it has been the Netherlands’ only international classical vocal competition featuring two categories: oratorio and Lied. This unique social institute is a vital part of the cultural life of the province of Noord-Brabant and the city of ’s-Hertogenbosch. Over the course of its existence, the IVC has built on its national and international prestige, with world-class winners such as Elly Ameling, Cora Burggraaf, Thomas Hampson, Howard Haskin, Robert Holl, Nelly Miricioiu, Jard van Nes, Lenneke Ruiten, Wolfgang Schöne and Elzbieta Szmytka.
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Toen George Gerswhins opera ‘Porgy and Bess’ in premi
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In 1943, after his health had deteriorated over a very short period of time, Béla Bartók was diagnosed with leukaemia. Almost three years earlier he had escaped World War II and left Europe for the United States, but there he felt isolated artistically and had financial problems on top of that. Recognition he only received for his piano playing, but due to his bad health he could not perform anymore after January 1943. The Hungarian composer was emotionally and physically bankrupt. He was in hospital when Serge Koussevitzky, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, came to ask him to compose a large orchestral piece. Bartók did not know the assignment was financed by his fellow emigrants and good friends violinist Joseph Szigeti and conductor Fritz Reiner. The assignment, to Bartók, came at a crucial stage in his life: he recovered his energy and managed to finish his Concerto for Orchestra within seven weeks. The premiere on December 1st 1944 in Boston was a great success and Bartók’s music now finally received recognition in the United States as well. New requests for compositions were made, but Bartók’s health once again failed him: he died in September 1945. In this broadcast: the fifth movement.
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It is noteworthy that Antonín Dvorák’s symphonies were all written within in a brief timespan. He composed his Symphony No. 4 between January and March 1874. Dvorak’s Czech colleague Bedrich Smetana, keen to conduct the piece’s premiere, had the honour to do so, in Prague. Unfortunately, the symphony was not a commercial success; Dvorák found it prudent to make several modifications. He conducted this rewritten version himself in 1892, but it was only in 1912, after the composer’s death, that the sheet music was published. Dvorák was inspired to write this symphony after Richard Wagner visited Prague to see his ‘Tannhäuser’ performed: echoes of this opera can be heard in Dvorák’s Symphony No. 4. Today’s broadcast is part of a series of all nine Dvorák Symphonies, which were performed by the Czech Philharmonic under the baton of the Czech conductor Jirí Belohlávek in 2014. Belohlávek won the Czech National Conducting Competition in 1970. After this, he served as guest conductor of the Czech Philharmonic for tw
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The Víctor Ullate Ballet brings a new version of an important, internationally performed classic to its repertoire. Choreographer and artistic director Eduardo Lao assumed the task of reinventing Léo Delibes’s ‘Coppélia’, using his versatile company of 23 dancers to contribute his personal vision. He emphasizes the comical spirit of Coppélia while keeping the original score written by Léo Delibes in 1870. Lao’s creation takes place in a cybernetic laboratory specialised in artificial intelligence, where Doctor Coppelius is attempting to create a female android that moves and acts like a human. Lao’s staging of Coppélia allows the Víctor Ullate Ballet to use its technical and artistic capacity by combining various styles and updating a historical ballet favourite.
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Violin virtuoso Henryk Wieniawski thought the piece was impossible to play, his colleague Pablo de Sarasate did not want to play it because he as a soloist refused to stand and wait with his violin in hand for the second half’s oboe solo to finish, and conductors Hans von Bülow and Joseph Hellmesberger allegedly both said that it is ‘a piece against the violin’ instead of ‘a piece for the violin’. Johannes Brahms’ violin concerto may not have been popular with everyone, but in the meantime it has become part of the standard repertoire. Brahms wrote the piece in the summer of 1878 for his good friend Joseph Joachim who also performed it for the first time, on New Year’s Day of 1879 in Leipzig. Soloist: Gil Shaham Conductor: Claudio Abbado Orchestra: Berliner Philharmonic Location: Teatro Massimo, Palermo, 2002
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The series ‘Philippe Herreweghe conducts Beethoven’ presents Beethoven’s nine symphonies. The Flemish conductor Philippe Herreweghe, who became chief conductor of the Royal Flemish Philharmonic ‘deFilharmonie’ in 1997, is a sought-after guest conductor who appears frequently with orchestras such as the Roycal Concertgebouw Orchestra and the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig. Herreweghe is also still the conductor of Collegium Vocale Gent, the prestigious choir he founded in 1970. Herreweghe is known for his familiarity with the music from the Romantic era. This series of Beethoven symphonies offers great examples of the historically informed performance practice. deFilharmonie performs these symphonies at the beautiful Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels. In 1799, Beethoven produced his Symphony No. 1, in a first attempt to beat his predecessors Joseph Haydn and W. A. Mozart at their own game. Indeed, the symphony opens in an original fashion using several unusual chord changes, followed by a slow, contemplative introduction. When seemingly unrelated opening chords bring in the full orchestra, it comes as a great surprise. Later, Beethoven shakes his revolutionary fist during the feverishly fast Menuetto. The opening of the finale reveals Beethoven’s predilection to use (nearly banal) musical material: note by note, the violins develop a scale that functions as the motif for the remainder the symphony.
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,,I also wrote something for the ‘In the Hall of the Mountain King’ scene – something I literally cannot stand listening to because it reeks of exaggerated Norwegian nationalism and troll-like complacency. But I do expect the irony to be apparent." Edvard Grieg was not very pleased with what is undoubtedly his most popular composition. His music to Henrik Ibsen’s play ‘Peer Gynt’ was a great success from the first performance in 1876 onwards and has since been universally loved. In this broadcast: 'Solveig’s Song'.
BRAVA Stingray PÁTEK 20.10.
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Brava presents the new programme ‘All of Bach’. Every Friday, Brava offers you the chance to enjoy performances of Bach’s most beautiful compositions. Moreover, interviews about Bach’s music will give you new insights. The series ‘All of Bach’ is an initiative of the Netherlands Bach Society, which has been a prominent player on the Dutch cultural scene for a long time.
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In days of yore we’re in the square in front of Beijing’s Forbidden City. Princess Turandot announces that anyone wishing to marry her must answer three riddles correctly. It’s all or nothing for her suitors: failure equals death. The prince of Persia has just failed, so he will be executed when the moon comes up... ‘Turandot’ is Giacomo Puccini’s rarely performed unfinished last opera. Always a fastidious and deliberate composer, writing ‘Turandot’ was an especially drawn-out process for Puccini. Nevertheless, the composer poured himself into the work, writing to a friend in March 1924, "I have placed, in this opera, all my soul." This particular performance of the opera was filmed outdoors in Italy’s Torre del Lago Puccini, in the province of Lucca. Enjoy the most breathtaking stage set you have ever seen!
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Who could imagine that a failed job application would lead to some of the most beautiful classical music ever written? Employed by Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, an unsatisfied Johann Sebastian Bach craved a career change in 1721. Wishing to join the court of Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg, Bach presented him with six new concertos in the hopes of securing a position. Unfortunately, Christian Ludwig never even thanked the composer for his majestic and superbly beautiful work. Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 is a challenge for today’s trumpeters.
BRAVA Stingray SOBOTA 21.10.
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Belmonte is at loss when his bethrothed Konstanze has been taken captive after a shipwreck, together with her maid Blondchen and servant Pedrillo, and put into a harem. He decides to go and rescue his beloved and manages, with the aid of Pedrillo, to break into the castle. But to get into the harem they first have to pass its overseer, Osmin, and Belmonte also wonders whether his beloved has stayed true to him all this while…
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All of the compositions Mexican Silvestre Revueltas wrote in the short span of his life were full of energy and humor. He was a close friend of Carlos Chávez, another great Mexican name in music, and it was Chávez that in 1929 convinced him to come back to Mexico. Revueltas had studied in Chicago and stuck around since. When back in Mexico, he worked as assistant-conductor of the Orquesta Sinfónico de México, as a teacher and as a solo violinist. He wrote a lot of music for Mexican films and was an active supporter of the labour movement. In 1940, Revueltas died, officially from lung cancer but it was a public secret that he had drunk himself to death. In this broadcast you can listen to ‘Sensemaya’, one of his best known pieces.
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This concert, which is organized annually as part of the official festivities in conjunction with the Nobel Prize Ceremony, presents the most renowned classical musicians. This broadcast brings you an enjoyable performance of Dmitri Shostakovich’s ‘Festive Overture’.
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French composer Hector Berlioz was one of the great advocates of programme music (music that portrays a story), though his overture ‘Le Corsaire’ has nothing to do with Lord Byron’s poem of the same name, about the life of pirate Jean Lafitte. He composed this piece during a visit to Nice in 1844 and initially called it ‘The Tower of Nice’. Only in 1851 the overture was given its eventual name, after he had revised the music for a London performance.
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Thomas Hampson, conductor Leonard Bernstein’s protégé when he was still alive, studied with Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Horst Günter and Marietta Coyle among others. He is one of the most prominent singers of this day, has performed at almost all of the great opera houses and concert halls and is a popular choice with conductors. In this recording he sings Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s aria for baritone and orchestra, ‘Rivolgete a lui lo sguardo’ KV 584. Performers: Vienna Philarmonic Orchestra, Conductor: Riccardo Muti
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When Claudio Abbado and his newly founded Lucerne Festival Orchestra perform at the Lucerne Festival, the whole musical world looks to Lucerne. 120 musicians or "best friends" are also renowned soloists or important players in many leading orchestras and ensembles (e.g. Natalia Gutman, Sabine Meyer, Kolja Blacher, Reinhold Friedrich). Live recording from a unique concert - special guest: Bryn Terfel. "A Conductor Is Back, An Orchestra Reborn" The New York Times Programme.
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On May 1, 1882, fifty members of the former Bilse Kapelle refused to sign their new contracts and decided to form their own democratically governed ensemble. Today still, the present-day Berlin Philharmonic continues to elect its new members and principal conductors. Isabel Iturriagagotia and Paul Smaczny accompanied the Berlin Philharmonic after chief conductor Claudio Abbado announced in February 1998 that he would not be renewing his contract after 2002. Maestros in Democracy, the most extensive documentation ever produced about the Berlin Philharmonic, shows the new candidates for Abbado's position in rehearsal with the orchestra, revealing the various working practices of Lorin Maazel, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Bernard Haitink, Daniel Barenboim, Simon Rattle and Zubin Mehta. Later in the film, after several nail-biting rounds of voting, full of expectation and excitement, the orchestra has to come to a decision...
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The year 1878 was an important one for Czech composer Antonin Dvorák. Thanks to his friend Johannes Brahms his works were first published in Germany, increasing his reputation and earning him more composition assigments. His compositions inspired by folk music were very popular with his audiences and also with his publisher because of this, which led the composer to write more and more ‘Slavic’ pieces in this period. As the name already suggests, this ‘Slavonic Dance’ belongs to the aforementioned category.
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The International Vocal Competition’s-Hertogenbosch (IVC) was founded in 1954. Since then, it has been the Netherlands’ only international classical vocal competition featuring two categories: oratorio and Lied. This unique social institute is a vital part of the cultural life of the province of Noord-Brabant and the city of ’s-Hertogenbosch. Over the course of its existence, the IVC has built on its national and international prestige, with world-class winners such as Elly Ameling, Cora Burggraaf, Thomas Hampson, Howard Haskin, Robert Holl, Nelly Miricioiu, Jard van Nes, Lenneke Ruiten, Wolfgang Schöne and Elzbieta Szmytka.
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Marc-André Hamelin from Canada owes his fame to his musical virtuosity and refined piano techniques. The New York Times even praised one of his performances so highly as calling it ,,the ultimate perfection". Hamelin is also active as a composer. This broadcast shows his Etude No. 7.
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The longing to overcome human boundaries lead the physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer to begin an experiment that formed a threat to the whole of humanity, and whose scientific results still do today. The question of the moral implications of the atomic bomb is raised in John Adams’ opera, just as much as that of the influence on the private lives of the main characters. Doctor Atomic is the fifth work to result from almost twenty years of collaboration between the American composer and his fellow American director and Erasmus Prize-winner Peter Sellars.
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nsky Theatre Orchestra and its musical director Valery Gergiev travel across Russia - for the past 10 years now! This year we can anticipate an exceptional musical gift: the Mariinsky Theatre Symphony Orchestra performing, under the baton of Valery Gergiev, the complete cycle of Sergei Prokofiev’s symphonies and piano concertos - a composer with whom Maestro Gergiev and the orchestra seem very much in tune. On the programme: 'Violin Concerto No. 1', 'Violin Concerto No. 2', and 'Piano Concerto No. 3'.
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With standing ovations, bouquets and rave reviews, Simon Rattle started his debut as chief conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic. He launched his 10-year tenure mixing tradition with Gustav Mahler's Fifth Symphony and future with a contemporary piece by the young composer Thomas Adčs, receiving an enthusiastic welcome. At the end of Mahler's Fifth Symphony, the audience cheered the conductor, calling him back five times to bows. The new chief conductor performed a miracle of transparency and ecstasy, sharpness of tone and ambiguity.
BRAVA Stingray ČTVRTEK 19.10.
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OPERA2DAY introduces you to ‘La troupe d’Orphée’, the travelling music ensemble assembled around the greatest and most divine vocalist of all time: Orphée. Witness how his beautiful voice commands wild animals and enchants the gods of the underworld. Meet the beautiful Euridice, the apple of his eye. Let yourself be moved by the story of their ill-fated love and marvel at the magical choreography and masterful music of Marc-Antoine Charpentier. OPERA2DAY’s production ‘La troupe d’Orphée’ is inspired by The Hague’s remarkable and dynamic opera history. From the mid-17th century, the city was often visited by travelling ‘troupes’, usually from France. The Hague’s riding schools and public open spaces formed the backdrop for their bubbling theatre and opera performances. As by magic, singing, dance, music, and theatre merged in these performances. OPERA2DAY’s production is an ode to that dynamic era. In ‘La troupe d’Orphée’, the fictitious music theatre ‘troupe’ is made up of dancers (the ‘Dutch Don’t Dance Division’), vocalists (Vox Luminis, and musicians (baroque ensemble OPERA2DAY). The unmatched star of our ‘troupe’ is history’s most famous singer: Orphée. We follow him and his ‘troupe’ in performance, while telling the timeless, tragic tale of his love for Euridice.
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The Waldbühne in Berlin, one of the most appealing outdoor amphitheatres on the European continent, is the home base of the Berliner Philharmoniker’s summer concerts. With over 20.000 attendances, these are some of the most popular classical music concerts in the world. This year Sir Simon Rattle, the Berliner Philharmoniker and the renowned pianist Yefim Bronfman present a superb selection of Russian music. Program: Tchaikovsky – ‘Three pieces from The Nutcracker’, Rachmaninoff – ‘Piano Concerto No. 3’, Tchaikovsky – ‘Pas de deux’, Lincke – ‘Berliner Luft’, Stravinsky – ‘Le Sacre du Printemps’.
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Works: Händel/Liszt: Sarabande und Chaconne über Themen aus dem Singspiel Almira, S.181, Rapsodie hongroise XIII, S244/13, Im Rhein, im schönen Strome, S272i (Soloist: Peter Gijsbertsen), Ich möchte hingehn, S296iii (Soloist: Estefaniá Perdomo), Mozart/Liszt: Fantasie über Themen aus die Oper Le Nozze di Figaro un Don Giovanni, S697. Pianist Mariam Batsashvili studied successively at the E. Mikeladze Central Music School in Tbilisi with Natalia Natsvlishvili and at the Hochschule für Musik Franz Liszt in Weimar with Grigory Gruzman. She won prizes from various competitions such as the First Prize at the International Franz Liszt Competition for Young Pianists in Weimar in 2011 and Second Prize at the María Herrero International Piano Competition in Granada in 2012. Aside from her native country Georgia, Mariam Batsashvili has performed in such countries as Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Russia, Israel, South Africa and China, both in recitals and with orchestras. She was a soloist with the Erfurt Philharmonisches Orchester and with the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra on numerous occasions.
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Herbert Blomstedt, together with Viktoria Mullova (violin), Nancy Argenta (soprano), Jurgen Wolf (organ), the Leipzig Gewandhausorchester and the St. Thomas Boys Choir celebrate the 10th anniversary of the German Reunification. From the Leipzig St. Thomasi Church they perform Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565, Motet 'Furchte dich nicht', BWV 228 Chaconne from the Partita in d minor, BWV 1004 and the concert is concluded by the 'Dona nobis pacem' from the Mass in b minor, BWV 232. From Felix Mendelssohn pieces from his oratorio 'Elias' are selected and from Ludwig van Beethoven the 5th Symphony in c minor, Op. 67 is performed.
BRAVA Stingray PÁTEK 20.10.
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Mussorgsky's loveless and brutal drama of the transformation of Russian society, which led to the rule of Peter the Great within the epic history of Russia, is powerfully modernised through Stein Winge's dramatic and uncompromising production. Performing the version completed by Shostakovich, the outstanding Russian-dominated cast and the orchestra and chorus of the Liceu are led by Michael Boder. Soloists: Nataliya Tymchenko, Graham Clark, Elena Zaremba, Vladimir Vaneev, Nikolai Putilin, Robert Brubaker, Vladimir Galouzine, Vladimir Ognovenko.
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The ‘Red Book of Montserrat’ is a collection of medieval manuscripts from the area surrounding the Virgin of Montserrat Abbey in Catalonia, Spain. This collection, which was compiled for use by pilgrims, contained liturgical, informative and instructive texts and songs about the Maria celebrations near the monastery of Montserrat. The collection, which was bound together in the late 14th century, gets its name from its 19th-century red binding. It contains a number of songs, ten of which include a musical notation. Some of these songs have the characteristics of folk songs: the pilgrims often spent their nights in churches, where they sang songs of devotion alongside traditional folk music. Also included are several canons, dances, and a motet. In today’s broadcast, Hesp
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The Nobel Prize Concert 2008 offers fantastic performers: Sir John Eliot Gardiner and his Monteverdi Choir, together with Eric Ericson Chamber Choir and the Scandinavian singers Miah Persson, soprano, Ann Hallenberg, alto, Helge Rönning, tenor, and Peter Mattei, bass. The orchestra, as is customary with the Nobel Prize Concert, is the Swedish Royal Philharmonic. The programme includes Dvorák's 'Symphony No. 7' and Mozart's 'Mass in C minor'.
BRAVA Stingray SOBOTA 21.10.
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Quebec's very own Robert Lepage (*1957) is seen as one of the most challenging and visionary theatre directors of our time. His staging of Igor Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress is striking. Firstly, Lepage sets the story in decadent 1950s Las Vegas rather than dark 18th-century London. Moreover, the dashing costumes, careful choreography, and ultra-modern scenography make this staging a text-book example of contemporary opera.
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Daniel Barenboim conducts the Berliner Philharmoniker in the Chateau de Versailles in Paris. Program: Maurice Ravel: 'Le tombeau de Couperin', Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: 'Piano Concerto K. 415', Ludwig van Beethoven: 'Eroica'.
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The Théâtre Impérial du Châtelet opened its doors for the very first time on 19 August 1862, in the presence of the Empress Eugénie. Seating 2,500 people and boasting a stage of 24 by 35 meters, it was the largest venue of its type in Paris at the time. It was an exceptional piece of work, noted for its outstanding sound quality: to achieve optimal sound reflection, parquet, wood-framed seating, and a dome glass roof were used. All over the world, cellist Gautier Capuçon is recognised as one of the most charismatic, enchanting and exuberant musicians performing today. He receives consistently high critical praise for his performances with the major orchestras and conductors across the globe, as well as for his recital and chamber music work at many of the world’s most prestigious venues and festivals. Born in Chambéry in 1981, Capuçon began playing the cello at the age of five. He studied at the Conservatoire National Supérieur in Paris with Philippe Muller and Annie Cochet-Zakine, and later with Heinrich Schiff in Vienna. Jérôme Ducros is a French composer and pianist, born on November 30 1974 in Avignon. He studied at the Conservatoire National Supérieur in Paris. He is known for his award-winning interpretation of Pierre Boulez’s composition ‘Incises’. He accompanies countless renowned soloists, among whom Philippe Jaroussky and – in this broadcast – Gautier Capuçon.
BRAVA Stingray NEDĚLE 22.10.
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Mozart’s ‘Don Giovanni’ is a breathtaking opera about one of the greatest ‘womanisers’ in classical music history. The main character, Don Giovanni, is irresistible to all women, rich or poor, married or unmarried. He is quite slapdash about values and feelings though and quickly grows tired of his conquests. Eventually everyone realises that behind his captivating appearance and pretty words this charmer is actually an unreliable and bad person. When confronted Don Giovanni refuses to better his life, ultimately leading to his demise. Ingo Metzmacher, The Netherlands Chamber Orchestra and the choir of De Nederlandse Opera supported a world class-cast in this amazing rendering of a classic.
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On October 9, 1989 in the DDR, 70.000 people demonstrated peacefully. This demonstration was a cry for freedom. Thanks to Kurt Masur, who was one of six prominent inhabitants of Leipzig to introduce the notion of 'peaceful revolution', the demonstration passed without bloodshed. On the same night, Masur conducted Johannes Brahms' 'Second Symphony' at Leipzig's Nikolaikirche. The following demonstrations partly caused the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989, which paved the way for the reunion of the two Germanies. On the 20th anniversary of the first peaceful demonstration, Masur once again conducts the Gewandhausorchester in Brahms' 'Second Symphony'.
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Daniel Barenboim rarely gives piano recitals these days, but here he dedicates a whole evening to Chopin on the occasion of the great composer’s 200th birthday anniversary in 2010. While Chopin used to advise his piano students to take singing lessons, Barenboim, as an experienced conductor of operas, is also very familiar with the human voice. With his brilliant virtuosity, he leads the audience through a most colourful programme, once again proving his talent for this repertoire. Programme: F. Chopin: Fantasy in F Minor Op. 49 - Nocturne in D Flat Major Op. 27/2 - Sonata No. 2 in B Flat Minor Op. 35 (Funeral March) - Barcarole in F Sharp Major Op. 60 - Waltz in F Major Op. 34 No. 3 - Waltz in A Minor Op. 34 No. 2 - Waltz in C Sharp Minor Op. 64 No. 2 - Berceuse in D Flat Major Op. 57 - Polonaise in A Flat Major Op. 53.